light-gathering power


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light-gathering power

(light grasp) A measure of the ability of an optical telescope to collect light and thus discern fainter objects. It is proportional to the area of the telescope aperture, i.e. to the square of the diameter of the primary mirror or objective.
References in periodicals archive ?
The enormous light-gathering power of Subaru Telescope's 8.
The aperture (diameter) of the primary lens or mirror in your telescope determines two things: the light-gathering power (light grasp) of the instrument and its resolving power--the ability to see fine detail in an image.
Most telescopes have poor optics because people in the past were interested only in total light-gathering power when they built large [telescopes]," says Kenneth J.
When light waves reaching the two scopes are combined wave for wave, the pair has the light-gathering power of a single 11.
While binoculars can show some of these things, you really need the greater light-gathering power and magnification of a telescope.
According to the most recent plans, the NNTT would be a square array of 8-meter mirrors that could work together to simulate the light-gathering power and resolution of a single 16-meter mirror or could work separately (SN: 1/3/87, p.
In order to use the maximum light-gathering power of a 6-inch telescope, you shouldn't use a magnification less that 22x, producing an exit pupil 7 mm across (the maximum most eyes can accept).
For some people it means getting a telescope with a larger lens (in the case of a refractor) or mirror (reflector), which offers greater light-gathering power and the ability to see fainter objects.
8-meter mirrors of the MMThave the total light-gathering power of a single mirror of 4.
Although Jerry's giant Astroscan lacks the compact size and portability of the original 4Vs-inch Edmund scope, it delivers nearly four times the light-gathering power thanks to its 8-inch f/4.
So are the planners of the National New Technology Telescope, which is projected to be a multiple-mirror arrangement with a light-gathering power equivalent to a 15-meter single mirror.
Thankfully, the extra magnification and light-gathering power of my 15x70s make the task considerably easier.