Lilburne


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Lilburne

John. ?1614-57, English Puritan pamphleteer and leader of the Levellers, a radical group prominent during the Civil War
References in periodicals archive ?
While the Leveller leader John Lilburne believes that The Agreement of the People will 'bring into being the first free Parliament that England has seen since the Norman Conquest' (132), Chidley warns that, 'We must remember that there is no people in the sense in which you use the world' (132).
The FSL is largely based on small scale soil maps, with properties assigned to parcels of soil through a process of interpretation and judgement by regional soil experts (Hewitt 2008; Lilburne et al.
22) John LILBURNE y OTROS, "Agreement of the people (1649)", en AA.
And the voices of litigants, some prominent in the political struggles of the day, like John Lilburne and Granville Sharpe, and other more ordinary people usually hidden from the eyes of the historian, also directly contribute to Halliday's analysis.
the King's court divines, the prison experience of John Lilburne, an investigation of the earliest Quakers as seen through their experience of 'possession' by spirits, the role of James Harrington, the place of Jews during the Parliamentary usurpation of government, the legacy of William Penn.
Halliday demonstrates that the judges did not rationalize their decisions in terms of a transcendent theory of rights and freedoms, which is the claim made by more radical advocates such as John Lilburne during the Commonwealth and Granville Sharp, the anti-slavery campaigner in the late eighteenth century.
He was counsel for John Lilburne, a "Leveller", or radical protester, charged with smuggling seditious books.
In "The Poet and the Father: Robert Penn Warren and the Redemption of Thomas Jefferson" Simpson analyzes Warren's long poem, "Brother to Dragons: A Tale in Verse and Voice" which imagines Jefferson's (and the poet's) attempt to come to terms with an horrific act committed by Jefferson's nephew, Lilburne Lewis, who butchered a 17-year-old slave to punish him for breaking a pitcher prized by his deceased mother.
This was so, Lilburne believed, because the authority to rule derived fundamentally from the will of the people.
Lynn IH, Lilburne LR, Mclntosh PD (2002) Testing a soil landscape model for dry greywacke steeplands on three mountain ranges in the South Island, New Zealand.
Lincoln Raitt, Lilburne Cyster, staff and students of Human ecology and Dietetic department.