Liliuokalani


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Liliuokalani

(lēlēo͞o'ōkälä`nē), 1838–1917, last reigning queen of the Hawaiian Islands. She ascended the throne in 1891 upon the death of her brother, King Kalakaua. Her refusal to recognize the constitutional changes inaugurated in 1887 precipitated a revolt, fostered largely by sugar planters (mostly American residents of Hawaii), that led to her dethronement early in 1893 and the establishment of a provisional government. Failing in an attempt to regain the throne in 1895, she formally renounced her royal claims. Much of the remainder of her life was spent in the United States, where she unsuccessfully entered against the federal government claims totaling $450,000 for property and other losses. The territorial legislature of Hawaii finally voted her an annual pension of $4,000 and permitted her to receive the income from a sugar plantation of 6,000 acres (2,428 hectares). She wrote many songs, including the popular "Aloha Oe," or "Farewell to Thee."

Liliuokalani

Lydia Kamekeha . 1838--1917, queen and last sovereign of the Hawaiian Islands (1891--95)
References in periodicals archive ?
Although no one will ever know what would have happened if the queen had decided to resist the coup, Liliuokalani wanted to avoid violence and consequently surrendered peacefully.
The missionaries also failed to educate Queen Liliuokalani about the Beta Israel or Falashas who are an ADP centered in Ethiopia.
Although unfinished, this book paints a vibrant portrait of Queen Liliuokalani and Hawaii during the second half of the nineteenth century, a time when forces in the United States sought the annexation of the islands in order to gain a permanent base in the Pacific.
government to the unlawful acts of its agents in assisting those who orchestrated the overthrow of Queen Liliuokalani.
While Liliuokalani states her biological parents had ten offspring, her genealogy lists only seven and of these only four are included in her pedigree: David, William, Liliuokalani and Miriam (Liliuokalani, 1898).
The Kingdom of Hawaii disappeared on January 17, 1893, when US marines backed a Honolulu coup by American sugar planters against Queen Liliuokalani, who opposed their expansion plans.
The famous song, "Aloha Oe," was written by Hawaii's last reigning monarch, Queen Liliuokalani.
A wide range of women is represented here, from the expected names like Pocahontas, Harriet Tubman, Amelia Earhart, and Hilary Clinton to lesser-known women like Maria Mitchell, an early astronomer, Queen Liliuokalani of Hawaii, and Maggie Kuhn, founder of the Gray Panthers.
Gulick and later served as the minister of the interior for Queen Liliuokalani.
In addition to Napoleon, West Point played host during Young's time to such other dignitaries as Queen Liliuokalani of Hawaii, Prince Komatsu of Japan, and Crown Prince Wilhelm of Germany.
They overthrew Queen Liliuokalani, (Lee lee oh kuh LUH nee) Hawaii's last monarch, in 1893.