Limacides

Limacides

 

(or slug poisons), chemical substances for the destruction of terrestrial mollusks without shells—”naked” (field) slugs—which are pests of many agricultural crops.

In most cases limacides penetrate into the bodies of slugs through the skin or with food in the process of feeding. Limacides include metaldehyde, slaked lime, dry powdered superphosphate, green vitriol, and a mixture (1:1) of tobacco dust and slaked lime. The most effective limacide is metaldehyde, a polymer of acetaldehyde. It is used in the form of granules containing 5 percent limacide or in the form of a 50 percent wettable powder; the granules or powder are used in poisoned bait or for dusting or spraying plants and soil. Use of metaldehyde must be terminated 20 days before harvesting. Treatment with limacides is performed at night, using artificial lighting, or before dawn, since slugs are nocturnal animals.

REFERENCE

Likharev, I. M. “Slizni i bor’ba s nimi.” Zashchita rastenii ot vreditelei i boleznei, 1960, no. 4.
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