lobe

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lobe

1. any of the subdivisions of a bodily organ or part, delineated by shape or connective tissue
2. short for ear lobe
3. any of the loops that form part of the graphic representation in cylindrical coordinates of the radiation pattern of a transmitting aerial
4. any of the parts, not entirely separate from each other, into which a flattened plant part, such as a leaf, is divided

lobe

1. See antenna.

lobe

[lōb]
(biology)
A rounded projection on an organ or body part.
(design engineering)
A projection on a cam wheel or a noncircular gear wheel.
(electromagnetism)
A part of the radiation pattern of a directional antenna representing an area of stronger radio-signal transmission. Also known as radiation lobe.
(engineering acoustics)
A portion of the directivity pattern of a transducer representing an area of increased emission or response.
(hydrology)
A curved projection on the margin of a continental ice sheet.

lobe

A segment of a circle in tracery; a foil.

lobe

A curve representing the relative signal strength plotted against the position of the aerial with respect to a target. Side lobes are small lobes of energy radiated by radar aerials in diverging directions to the main beam—usually four, two at an angle of 7° from the main beam and two at angle of 90°. Side lobes may cause false weak echoes. An antenna pattern may have just one lobe, or it may have several lobes. Different lobes may have different magnitudes. The strongest lobe is called the main or major lobe. The weak lobes are called secondary or minor lobes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Structures of the cerebral nuclei and the limbic lobe were chosen because they showed higher expression in a preliminary study performed with eight genes of DSCR (13).
To rank the expression in several brain substructures of cerebral nuclei and limbic lobe for each one of genes a Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was performed reducing the R space from 19 coliner variables to 6 principal components ([R.sup.19] > [R.sup.6]); the PCA analysis was complemented with a Cluster Analysis (CA).
Differential expression of DSCR in human brain A quantitative analysis of global transcription of DSCR genes along the structures of the brain nuclei and the limbic lobe revealed that the highest values of z-score were registered in the area that includes the putamen for DSCR3, RCAN1 as well as in left and right caudate nuclei for DSCR6, and the left and right globus pallidus for DSCR3, SH3GBR, DYRK1A, CLIC6 and PRMT2.
A Cluster Analysis (CA), using the median distance values, revealed that the expression of some genes was produced in association with a series of sub structures both from cerebral nuclei and limbic lobe (Fig.
For the Limbic Lobe, six components were discriminated that explained 76.1% of the total variance.
On the other hand, for the limbic lobe the analysis also showed two associations in which the first one included DSCR2, 5 and 6 whereas the second one grouped DSCAM and DSCR4 (Fig.
One example of it was the overexpression of RCAN1, RUNX1 in contrast with the underexpression of DYRK1A that occur in caudate nuclei head left and right, putamen, internal and external globus pallidus of normal brain Such result, lead us to propose that in normal brain, expression of these genes in specific structures of cerebral nuclei, and limbic lobe regulate not only cognitive function but emotional ones via a complex network of gene expression responsible by the learning and memory functions among others associated process (23,24).
Four lobes are visible from the outside, namely, the frontal, the parietal, the occipital and, the temporal lobe, while the other two are internal: the insula and limbic lobes. The frontal lobe is mainly associated with reasoning, planning, parts of speech, movement, emotions, and problem solving.
The connection between the limbic system and the deep parts of the temporal lobes is so intimate and intricate that the temporal lobes are often called the limbic lobes, and it has been known for many years that the activity of these lobes produces effects quite different to other lobes of the brain.