Lincoln


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Related to Lincoln: Abraham Lincoln, Lincoln University

Lincoln,

city and district (1991 pop. 79,980), county seat of LincolnshireLincolnshire
, county (1991 pop. 573,900), 2,662 sq mi (6,895 sq km), E England, on the North Sea and The Wash. The county seat is Lincoln. It was formerly divided into three administrative counties: the Parts of Holland, the Parts of Kesteven, and the Parts of Lindsey.
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, E England, in the Parts of Kesteven, on the Witham River. Located at the junction of the Roman Fosse Way and Ermine Street, the city is a center of road and rail transportation. Manufactures include heavy machinery, light-metal products, automobile and electronic parts, and food products.

Lincoln was an ancient British settlement, the Roman Lindum or Lindum Colonia, and was one of the Five Boroughs of the Danes. Lincoln Castle, begun by William I in 1068, was contested in the civil war between Matilda and Stephen (12th cent.). The town was burned in the 12th cent.; three parliaments were held in Lincoln in the 14th cent. Parliamentarians captured it in 1644.

For centuries horse races and fairs have been held in Lincoln. The Lincoln Cathedral, first built from 1075 to 1501, has a central tower 271 ft (83 m) high, containing the famous bell "Great Tom of Lincoln." One of the few extant copies of the Magna Carta is in the cathedral. In Lincoln are teacher-training, theological, art, and technical colleges.


Lincoln.

1 City (1990 pop. 15,418), seat of Logan co., central Ill., in a farm area; inc. 1865. It is a shipping and industrial center in an agricultural area with light manufacturing. The city was platted and promoted (1853) with the aid of Abraham Lincoln and named for him when he was still an unknown country lawyer. Lincoln practiced law there from 1847 to 1859, and buildings and places associated with him have been preserved or reconstructed. A state school for the mentally retarded is in the city.

2 City (1990 pop. 191,972), state capital, and seat of Lancaster co., SE Nebr.; inc. 1869. It is the railroad, trade, and industrial center for a large grain and livestock area. Cattle are slaughtered and processed; there is printing and publishing; and beverages, construction materials, electronics, motorcycles, sports equipment, valves and cylinders, asphalt, and automotive parts are among its manufactures. A number of insurance companies have their home offices there. Founded in 1864 as Lancaster, the city was chosen as the site of the capital in 1867 and renamed. It is the seat of the Univ. of Nebraska, Union College, and Nebraska Wesleyan Univ. A planetarium, an art gallery and sculpture garden, the state historical society and its museum, and a performing arts center are in the city. The state penitentiary and several hospitals are also there. The state capitol, designed by B. G. Goodhue, with sculptures by Lee LawrieLawrie, Lee
, 1877–1963, American sculptor, b. Germany. Brought to America as an infant, he studied with Augustus Saint-Gaudens and Philip Martiny. Lawrie specialized in architectural sculpture. Among his works are decorations for the U.S.
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, was completed in 1934. William Jennings BryanBryan, William Jennings
, 1860–1925, American political leader, b. Salem, Ill. Although the nation consistently rejected him for the presidency, it eventually adopted many of the reforms he urged—the graduated federal income tax, popular election of senators, woman
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 lived in Lincoln from 1887 to 1916; his home is preserved.

3 Town (1990 pop. 18,045), Providence co., NE R.I.; set off from Smithfield and inc. 1871. Once a textile town, its manufactures include wire, tubing, metal parts, and thread. Limestone has been quarried there since colonial times. Many pre-Revolutionary houses and a state park are in the town.


Lincoln,

county: see LincolnshireLincolnshire
, county (1991 pop. 573,900), 2,662 sq mi (6,895 sq km), E England, on the North Sea and The Wash. The county seat is Lincoln. It was formerly divided into three administrative counties: the Parts of Holland, the Parts of Kesteven, and the Parts of Lindsey.
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.

Lincoln

 

a city in the USA on Salt Creek (Missouri Basin). Capital of the state of Nebraska. Population, 149,500 (1970). The food industry is represented by flour mills, creameries, and slaughterhouses. Agricultural machinery is produced in Lincoln. There is a university.


Lincoln

 

a city in Great Britain, on the Witham River; the center of the county of Lincolnshire. Population, 74,200 (1971). It has machine-building (stationary motors, mining, construction, and excavating equipment, gas turbines, automobile parts, electrical engineering articles, and agricultural machinery) and food industries.

The irregular medieval plan of the city has been preserved. Monuments include an ancient Roman gate; two pre-Romanesque church towers; Romanesque houses, churches, and a donjon (middle of the 12th century); and a Gothic town hall and bridge (both constructed in the 15th century). The well-known Lincoln Cathedral (1075–1380) has Romanesque portals; Gothic elements include the richly decorated facade, the nave, and the choir (which includes the eastern Angel Choir; c. 1256— 1320). The cathedral has three slender towers.

REFERENCE

Hill, J. W. F. Medieval Lincoln. Cambridge, 1948.

Lincoln

1
Abraham. 1809--65, US Republican statesman; 16th president of the US His fame rests on his success in saving the Union in the Civil War (1861-- 65) and on his emancipation of slaves (1863); assassinated by Booth

Lincoln

2
1. a city in E central England, administrative centre of Lincolnshire: an important ecclesiastical and commercial centre in the Middle Ages; Roman ruins, a castle (founded by William the Conqueror) and a famous cathedral (begun in 1086). Pop.: 85 963 (2001)
2. a city in SE Nebraska: state capital; University of Nebraska (1869). Pop.: 235 594 (2003 est.)
3. short for Lincolnshire
4. a breed of long-woolled sheep, originally from Lincolnshire
References in periodicals archive ?
The Lincoln Exchange Sales Event expires at the close of business on March 31, 2012, and new retail delivery must be taken from dealer stock by April 2, 21012.
Chapter titles include "Abraham Lincoln: The Myth and the Man," "'All-Conquering Mind': The Education of Abraham Lincoln," "An Old-Line Henry Clay Whig," "The Slave Power," "Lincoln and the Union," "Race and Restoration," "Lincoln's America: The Rise and Fall of the Second Republic," and "The Great Democrat: Abraham Lincoln and the Meaning of the Civil War.
In fact, you yourself might be saying along about now, "Hey, I know who Abraham Lincoln is, and why is this Dwyer character seeking to tarnish him?
The popular image of the legendary figure Abraham Lincoln is afflicted with an a historical and un-political perfectionism, both among those who celebrate him and those who, in disillusioned rebound from the myth, debunk him.
I don't think Lincoln could've been the president he was without going through the dark night of the soul.
Lincoln will start up the new Metso Paper tissue machine in the 3rd quarter of 2006, doubling its tissue capacity.
as a young aspiring lawyer, Lincoln met one Joshua Speed at the local general store and immediately agreed to share a bed with him for lodging.
According to Lincoln, what was the fighting of the American Civil War "testing"?
At Time Warner Center, Lincoln joins a unique mix of luxury lifestyle associates that create a sophisticated urban village complete with world-renowned entertainment, fine dining, a five-star hotel, premium residences and specialty shops.
Bennett points out that between 1854 and 1860 Lincoln said publicly, at least twice that America was made for White people and not for the Negroes, and eight times that he was in favor of White Supremacy and twenty times that he was opposed to equal rights for Blacks.
For Mary Lincoln, viewed by capital insiders as a parvenu outsider from the hinterlands out west, securing Madame Keckly's services was the social equivalent of joining the right club," Fleischner writes.
Lincoln was running his established scrap business in Erie when a number of factors came together that would jointly serve as the incentive to launch National Recycling.