Lindemann theory

Lindemann theory

[′lin·də·mən ‚thē·ə·rē]
(solid-state physics)
A theory of the melting point of solids according to which solids melt when the amplitude of oscillation of the atoms becomes so great that neighboring atoms collide.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Historically, the Lindemann theory was first introduced in 1921 by Fredrick Lindemann and later developed by him together with Cyril Hinshelwood [7].