linear system

(redirected from Linear theory)

linear system

[′lin·ē·ər ′sis·təm]
(control systems)
A system in which the outputs are components of a vector which is equal to the value of a linear operator applied to a vector whose components are the inputs.
(mathematics)
A system where all the interrelationships among the quantities involved are expressed by linear equations which may be algebraic, differential, or integral.
References in periodicals archive ?
Their wave equation also contains higher-order nonlinear terms, because while in linear theory surface gravity waves do not feel each other or exchange energy, Kadri explains, "in reality the picture is more complicated, and nonlinear effects may come into play, resulting in energy exchange and even generation of new waves, sometimes.
They experimentally proved that when a proper strain tensor is chosen, such generalizations of the structures of the linear theory to the nonlinear regime might provide an efficient method to model the mechanical behaviors of such materials at moderate deformations.
The 57 papers consider such topics as the static analysis of the load-bearing structure of a transparent roof, the integral representation of constitutive equations in the linear theory of viscoelasticity, the numerical and experimental assessment of a highway arch viaduct, and the optimal design of structures made of fiber-reinforced concrete.
Koston and Saurin share findings and insights from their decade of research at the Institute for Problems in Mechanics at the Russian Academy of Sciences, into the linear theory of elasticity and finite element analysis.
Taking into the account results of linear theory of interaction between annular electron beams and AMs [7, 17] azimuthal wave number and radius of the waveguide have been chosen in such way that the following equation was satisfied: [absolute value of m][delta]) [approximately equal to] 0.
The nonlinear-system theory is a field of general system theory which is examined much fewer than classical linear theory.
Micciche offers a recursive rather than linear theory and practice of emotions through her consistent emphasis on praxis, which is illuminated through her attentiveness to the material conditions through which writing is produced, enacted, and administered.
Simplifications are the consequence of using the geometrically linear theory and the Kirchhoff--Love hypotheses.
The main difference between the current nonlinear source-filter interaction theory and the older linear theory is that formants need to be avoided, not sought out, in the choice of a vowel.
This work provides a self-contained and up-to-date account of mathematical results in the linear theory of water waves.