lingual tonsil

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lingual tonsil

[′liŋ·gwəl ′tän·səl]
(anatomy)
An aggregation of lymphoid tissue composed of 35-100 separate tonsillar units occupying the posterior part of the tongue surface.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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In addition, infected follicular lingual tonsils and infected thyroglossal cysts are the most common factors for a posterior lingual abscess [7-9, 12].
It is also useful in soft palate, palliative tonsils, post nasal space, lingual tonsils.
Waldeyer's ring, a ring of lymphoid tissue in the pharynx, is formed by the palatine tonsils, as well as the pharyngeal tonsils (adenoids), tubal tonsils and lingual tonsils. The arterial supply to the tonsils is extensive and comes from the external carotid system.
The palatine tonsils, found at the posterior aspect of the soft palate, and the lingual tonsils, seen at the base of the tongue anterior to the epiglottis, often enlarge during upper respiratory infections as well.
(3) Human papillomavirus-positive tumors have a marked predilection for the palatine and lingual tonsils, where they account for about two-thirds of carcinomas arising at these sites in the United States.
The adenoids are located at the back of the nasopharnyx in close proximity to inhaled pathogens and are covered with ciliated pseudostratified epithelium (respiratory epithelium) that may better support primary virus replication than the palantine and lingual tonsils, which are located in the lower pharynx and covered with nonkeratinized, stratified, squamous epithelium.
The bulk of the disease develops in the Waldeyer ring (palatine tonsils, nasopharyngeal adenoids, base of the tongue, and lingual tonsils).
The lingual tonsils, located at the base of the tongue, are part of the Waldeyer ring, which is made up of lymphoid tissue that surrounds the oropharyngeal inlet and includes the palatine tonsils and the adenoid pad.
Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the neck demonstrated prominent lymphoid tissue in the nasopharynx and lingual tonsils, as well as a fungating mass that extended down into the supraglottic space and partially compromised the airway (figure 1).
On examination with a Jackson laryngoscope, there were no mucosal abnormalities, but a generalized fullness of the left piriform sinus and vallecula was observed, as well as some fullness of the lingual tonsils and faucial pillars.
In type III, obstruction emanates from the tongue, lingual tonsils, or supraglottis.
However, cervical CT showed pathological mucous thickening of lingual tonsils and regional adenopathies (Figure 2).