linked list


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Related to linked list: doubly linked list

linked list

[′liŋkt ′list]
(computer science)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

linked list

(programming)
A data structure in which each element contains a pointer to the next element, thus forming a linear list.

A doubly linked list contains pointers to both the next and previous elements.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

linked list

In data management, a group of items, each of which points to the next item. It allows for the organization of a sequential set of data in noncontiguous storage locations.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The concept of linked list was introduced by Allen Newell, Cliff Shaw and Herbert in 1955 as core data structure for Information Processing Language (IPL).
ACM curriculum 2001, 2008 and 2013 proposes linked list as major topic in courses such as fundamental of data structures, data structures and algorithms, parallel algorithms and system programming (Roberts et al., 1999).
Linked list holds a central importance in the course of data structures.
The Linked list is classified according to different compositions of its nodes (Dastidar et al., 2003).
In terms of its implementation linked list can be categorized into imperative, circular, abstract data type (ADT), generic, sentinel and array based linked lists.
The ordered Linked list was best for search, update, and delete operations.
For the number of errors successfully found in the stack PUSH operation, a significant difference in Group II was indicated by an F(2,16) = 3.65, p = 0.0495, with further analysis by the Duncan multiple range test (alpha = 0.05) showing significantly more errors found for the linked list than for the array/linked list combination.
A two-way analysis of variance was performed for both measures (errors and time) on the data for the stack PUSH operation, with a mean effect of data structure (array versus linked list versus array and linked list) and with "blocking" on individuals.
For the time to find errors, Group I's results show that the linked list algorithm was significantly easier than the array algorithm, but the learning effect confounds interpretation.
For example, a representation of stacks using an array/linked list combination can be understood by first understanding the representation of stacks using unbounded arrays and then the representation of unbounded arrays using a linked list of fixed-size arrays.