Liquid Semiconductors

Liquid Semiconductors

 

substances that have semiconductor properties in the liquid state. The melting of many solid semiconductors, such as silicon and germanium, is accompanied by a sharp increase in their electrical conductivity, up to values typical of metals, rfowever, there are some semiconductors that are characterized by a decrease in conductivity upon melting (HgSe) or by the retention of a low level of conductivity. These materials retain in the liquid state the semiconductor-type dependence of electrical conductivity on temperature. There are a number of liquid semiconductors that lose their semiconducting properties at high temperatures and acquire metallic properties. For example, tellurium-selenium alloys are semiconductors in the solid state, as well as in the molten state. Further heating of tellurium-selenium alloys rich in tellurium leads to a rapid increase in their electrical conductivity, and they become metals. The selenium-rich alloys, however, exhibit the opposite behavior: their electrical conductivity decreases, but the nature of its dependence on temperature is typical of semiconductors.

REFERENCES

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References in periodicals archive ?
Tauc, Ed., Amorphous and Liquid Semiconductors, Plenum Press, New York, NY, USA, 1974.
Tauc, Amorphous and Liquid Semiconductors Plenum, London, (1974).
Although it is an empirical relation (also called as the compensation rule), the MNR has been frequently observed in a wide variety of condensed matter, particularly in disordered, amorphous, and nanocrystalline materials that exhibit a thermally activated behavior, such as amorphous silicon [24], chalcogenide glasses [25,26], liquid semiconductors [27], and polymers [28].