Lissamphibia

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Lissamphibia

The subclass of Amphibia including all living amphibians (frogs, toads, salamanders, and apodans). The other two subclasses are the Labyrinthodontia and the Lepospondyli. See Labyrinthodontia, Lepospondyli

Living amphibians are grouped together by possession of a unique series of characters, the most important of which are (1) pedicellate teeth, consisting of two segments, a crown and a pedicel; (2) an operculum-plectrum complex of the middle ear; (3) the papilla amphibiorum, a special sensory area of the inner ear; (4) green rods in the retina of the eye; (5) similar skin glands; and (6) a highly vascular skin used in respiration (cutaneous respiration). See Amphibia, Anura, Urodela

McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Bioscience. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Lissamphibia

[‚li‚sam′fib·ē·ə]
(vertebrate zoology)
A subclass of Amphibia including all living amphibians; distinguished by pedicellate teeth and an operculum-plectrum complex of the middle ear.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Lissamphibian remains are relatively abundant in Lano and consist of about 200 isolated bones.
(1990) provided a preliminary list of the Lano vertebrates, including actinopterygians, lissamphibians, squamates, turtles, crocodyliforms, dinosaurs, pterosaurs, and mammals from the continental deposits, and selachians from the marine beds.
The estimated body size ranges from less than 100 g for lissamphibians and mammals to about 3-4 tons for the largest dinosaur.
At least 37 continental vertebrate taxa are known in the Lano 1 and 2 sites, including actinopterygians, lissamphibians, lepidosaurs, turtles, crocodyliforms, dinosaurs, pterosaurs, and mammals (see Table 1).
Lano enlarges our knowledge of the latest Cretaceous faunas: it includes one of the oldest records of both Salamandridae and Palaeobatrachidae lissamphibians in the world (Duffaud and Rage, 1999), and one of the oldest records of amphisbaenians or anguids in Europe (Rage, 1999).
The Lano assemblage is composed of nearly 40 vertebrate species (i.e., actinopterygians, lissamphibians, lepidosaurs, turtles, crocodyliforms, dinosaurs, pterosaurs, and mammals), making it one of the most diverse associations hitherto known for this age in Europe (see Csiki-Sava et al., 2015).
Although the cells generally emerge after neural tube closure, emigration in some species is initiated from still-open neural folds prior to completion of neurulation, as is the case in anuran lissamphibians and mammals (for review, see Baker and Bronner-Fraser, 1997).
These include crocodylians, turtles, squamates and lissamphibians (Wilson 1986; Runkel 1988).
Some small bone fragments from the site of La Cantalera are referred to the lissamphibians, documenting the presence of at least two taxa: a salamander-like albaner-petontid and a discoglossid frog (Table 1).