Listvenite

Listvenite

 

a metasomatic rock consisting of carbonates (most often ankerite), quartz, and muscovite or fuchsite, with an admixture of various minerals (talc, chlorite, actinolite, albite, tourmaline, rutile, sphene). Listvenites are bright green (owing to the fuchsite) or gray (when they contain colorless muscovite). They are formed as a result of the process of listvenitization of serpentinites and other ultrabasic and basic rock. Listvenites usually occur in the form of lenses or veinlike bodies in sheeted and slightly calcified rock, and they can form selvages around gold-bearing quartz veins. Listvenites were first discovered in the Urals and described by the German geologist G. Rose (1842).

References in periodicals archive ?
2] and includes Serpentinized Pridotites Harzburgite, micro-gabbro dykes, listvenite dykes, sheeted dykes, pillow lavas, metamorphic rocks, calcareous schists, and upper cretaceous radiolarite cherts.
Listvenites have appeared along the region's faults in dyke like state and brownish yellow color.
However, contribution of other possible primary sources, like ophiolitic rocks, listvenites and laterites, cannot be discarded.