literalism

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literalism

literal or realistic portrayal in art or literature
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, Vishanoff mentions and implicitly accepts the literalist al-Nazzam's (d.
It should have been no surprise, then, when last month Tony Perkins, president of the rabid right-wing, so-called Family Research Council - whom some might call a Biblical literalist - asserted on CNN's "Belief Blog" that Jesus was a free market capitalist who would condemn the Occupy movement.
These biblical literalists accordingly pay close attention to the Bible's text, which, they believe, carries a meaning that is fixed, ascertainable, and timeless.
Dr Ahmed distinguishes between three traditions that have shaped the Muslim world: mystic, modernist and literalist.
Of course, there is another side to Islamism: Islam, like Christianity, has witnessed, from the outset, a struggle between a narrow, literalist and intolerant interpretation in opposition to the intellectual tradition grounded in philosophy and reasoning and in transforming knowledge.
A literalist reading of 2 Kings by William Tyndale and John Foxe, who found parallels between King Josiah and boy King Edward VI, contributed to 200 years of violence in Western Europe, according to Simpson.
The answer, Simpson concludes, is that the "new, immensely demanding, and punishing textual culture marked by literalist impersonality" has pushed all into rigid postures of persecution and masochism (p.
And biblical literalists have long argued that the Big Bang picture of a universe billions of years old is off by many orders of magnitude.
She writes that "to literalists, spiritualism's true spark came in 1848 from something no more or less powerful than a bored teenage girl.
A further contrast, which in "Art and Objecthood" remains largely implicit, concerns the fact that, whereas in modernist paintings and sculptures the constituent relationships were intended to be what they are by the artist, (7) the relationship between the literalist work and the beholder, although conditioned in a general way by the circumstances of exhibition, was understood by the literalists themselves as emphatically not determined by the work itself and therefore as not intended as such by its maker.
According to these literalists, Adam and Eve ruined it all for us by biting into an apple.
The literalists among the Anglican communion argue that God has not beaten about the burning bush here, and though we might have toned down the legal consequences, there's no getting away from the meaning.