Quotation

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quotation

1. Commerce a statement of the current market price of a security or commodity
2. an estimate of costs submitted by a contractor to a prospective client; tender
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Quotation

 

the determination of rates of exchange of foreign currencies, securities (stocks and bonds), or values of commodities on an exchange.

In capitalist countries the quotation service is generally carried out by a special body of a commodity, stock, or currency exchange (usually by a quotation commission); the quotations are published in exchange bulletins on wholesale prices for commodities, values of securities (stocks and bonds), and rates of exchange of foreign currencies. Only the securities of the limited number of joint-stock companies that control a major share of production in various sectors of the national economy are permitted to be quoted on the exchanges. For example, in the United States in the mid-1960’s, the securities of fewer than 0.1 percent of the total number of American corporations were quoted.

Rates of exchange of foreign currencies are established by state currency bodies. Black market exchange rates generally function side by side with the official currency rates. Two basic methods of quotation of foreign currency exist: direct and indirect. The more common is direct quotation, in which the unit of foreign currency is expressed in terms of national currency (for example, in mid-1973 in France US $1 equaled 4.6041 French francs). In indirect quotation, used mainly in Great Britain, the unit of national currency is expressed in terms of foreign currency (£1 equaled $2.58).

In the USSR, foreign currency rates are quoted by the Gos-bank (State Bank) of the USSR and are published monthly in a bulletin. Direct quotation is used.

M. IU. BORTNIK


Quotation

 

a literal excerpt from a written work. A quotation is an authoritative statement that most precisely expresses an idea that a writer wishes to support. Quotations are also used to criticize an idea cited and as valuable factual material to illustrate a point. They are found mostly in scholarly works (usually in the humanities) and official and business texts. They are either enclosed in quotation marks or italicized and are accompanied by a reference to the source.

Provided that the quoted author’s ideas are not distorted, it is permissible to modernize the spelling and punctuation and to omit a word or words, marking the omission by a series of dots (ellipsis points).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

quotation

A price quoted by a contractor, subcontractor, material supplier, or vendor to furnish materials, labor, or both.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, what if there is no way of escaping the world which consists only of stale literary quotations?
Their anti-Clinton arguments leaned heavily on literary quotations, which are, of course, often a convenient substitute for logic.
The world depicted here in sultry nocturnal colors is one of good-looking young men and women who are into jazz, poetry, photography, bongo drums, citing literary quotations and having high-spirited discussions about relationships and life.
At the same time, Egloff was given the assignment of writing a screenplay of William Trevor's novel Reading Turgenev for Playhouse Pictures, and set out to explore the context of the literary quotations in Trevor's book by reading everything Turgenev wrote.
Furthermore, the book is replete with numerous historical and literary quotations that provide a delightful addition to the author's technical presentation.
It's a good feeling to have a stock of literary quotations to fall back on when you're in trouble.
The September 2012 "Best of the South" issue contains literary quotations in Marc Smirnoff's "Editor's Box" (evidently already in the pipeline when Smirnoff was sacked in July), which begins, "The Best Southern Words Ever?
And the orchestra provided a subtle, alert, delicate backing to the well balanced communicative virtuosity of London Voices in Luciano Berio's Sinfonia, with its collage of post-it notes of musical and literary quotations.