literate programming

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literate programming

(programming, text)
Combining the use of a text formatting language such as TeX and a conventional programming language so as to maintain documentation and source code together.

Literate programming may use the inverse comment convention.

Perl's literate programming system is called pod.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such polish makes it pleasant to read a literate program, but it can hardly be considered distinctive of literate programs: authors have polished their programs for careful exposition for years.
Verisimilitude is unique among these three aspects in that it distinguishes a literate program from a program that has merely been highly polished and presented with attention to cosmetic details.
Literate programming is related with aspect-oriented programming in that a literate program typically consists of a description of various aspects of a system.
library design patterns, aspects, literate programs, layered modeling, a design approach with role modeling, design pattern constraints, and architecture description languages.
This is an unconventional way to review, but in fact, I did what any programmer would do faced with the task of converting a conventional, though heavily documented, program into a literate program.
So far as I can see, Lindsay's literate program started out as a conventional program, then was somewhat edited, and then interleaved with new commentary.
What shows up in the proof is exactly as much structure as needed, with a minimum of notation; the same thing should be true of a literate program.
In his literate program in this Communications (see "Further Reading"), Hanson uses a profiler to tune a program that is a couple of pages long.
I expect that most readers of this column will enjoy most literate programs and their reviews.
A literate program contains not only the needed statements in a programming language, but also a precise problem statement, a summary of the background needed to understand the solution, an evaluation of alternatives, assessments of trade-offs between the running time and space, or between running time and programming time, and suggestions on how to modify the program.
programming Pearls of April 1987 contained readers' comments on Knuth's literate program, as well as an unimplemented solution to the problem by David Gries.
This column presents some readers' comments on May's program, and David Gries's literate program for that problem.