lithophone


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lithophone

[′lith·ə‚fōn]
(materials)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Inventions and Innovations The Musical Stones of Skiddaw, 1840, Keswick Museum (Cumbria) This eight octave lithophone was built by Joseph Richardson - a member of the Keswick family - in 1840 from 'hornfels', a type of stone quarried from Skiddaw mountain.
This eight octave lithophone was built by Joseph Richardson -- a member of the Keswick family - in 1840 from 'hornfels', a type of stone quarried from Skiddaw mountain.
Litophone (Otico) (Lithophone [Otic]; all works 2017), for example, had eight ladderlike sections cut into it from top to bottom and was distinctly taller than it was wide.
The work will be enhanced by alabaster dust montages and the sounds of alabaster created from a lithophone.
This would have addressed the problem of the prosodic disjointedness that occurred when, as hinted by the old Wei court musician Ch'en, the bell (and lithophone) sustaining tones hung in the air too long and drowned out various words.
The first track on Katalog is a solo piece of the slate "xylophone"--the Lithophone.
Inorganic pigment line includes Tiona (registered) titanium dioxide (rutile and anatase), reportedly excellent for tinting strength and hiding power, in addition to cadmium pigments (pure and lithophone).
Electomechanical Lithophone - Jay Harrison Electromechanical Lithophone is an installation by artist Jay Harrison that invites the audience to step inside an immersive percussion instrument and experience it from within.
Between Monday, October 24 and Sunday, October 30, experience the "sound of slate" at the National Slate Museum (in the foundry) as musician Jay Harrison literally make slate sing with his electronic lithophones.
In chapter 1, he explores aspects of music, from its intrinsic sound, to the qualities of voices, instruments, such as lithophones (dating to the Paleolithic era and still in use today), percussion bars, bells, gongs, and rattles.