Little Carpathians


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Little Carpathians

 

(Malé Karpaty), mountains in Czechoslovakia, the extreme western spur of the Western Carpathians. They extend for 100 km from the Danube Valley at Bratislava to the southern spurs of the White Carpathians (Bile Karpaty). Elevation, to 768 m (Mount Zaruby). They are composed of limestones, granites, schists, and dolomites. There are frequent outcrops of rocky monadnocks, and karst is present. Oak and beech forests grow in the Little Carpathians; there are vineyards on the lower slopes.

References in periodicals archive ?
During this trip, tourists learn more about chamois, the nature in the national park, as well as why marmots whistle.European mouflons can be observed in the Little Carpathians.
Possibilities that can give impetus to the development are the presence of recreational zones, the so-called Little Carpathians - mountains in the village of Vyshniv, as well as a good location (a short distance from Ivano-Frankivsk and Lviv), which, if improved road conditions, can give development.
Perched on the banks of the Danube River and foothills of the Little Carpathians, Bratislava, the cultural heart of Slovakia is a booming tourist destination.
class="es-text-justifyerveny Kame turns into a theatre sceneBy the Little Carpathians, lying between the Bratislava and Trnava Regions, hides the castle named erveny Kame (Red Stone).
A list of 10 not-to-miss events this month, like the tour of wine cellars in the Little Carpathians, dancing in Kosice, the Night of Museums and Galleries, and cleaning up Mt Chopok for a great reward.Welcome to May, or the month of love as it is also known.
com/video/313269066?portrait=08) Open Wine Cellars on St Urban's DayWinemakers will open 133 wine cellars for the thirteenth time in the Little Carpathians region, spreading from Devin, near Bratislava, to Dolne Oresany, near Trnava, on St Urban's Day.
class="es-text-justify10) Out of the Circle Miller Exhibit class="es-text-justify class="es-text-justifyThe Mill Exhibit presents the development of milling in the Little Carpathians from the 18th century until the 1950s.