Liu Chih-chi

Liu Chih-chi

(lyo͞o jûr-jē), 661–721, Chinese T'ang dynasty historian. Drawing on experience gained while working on histories of the preceding dynasties, he wrote the first important Chinese work on historiography, the Understanding of History (Shih-t'ung). In a series of essays Liu discusses the origin, development, and relative merits of various forms of historical writing.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Another article continuing in this vein is the important study on "Chinese Historical Criticism: Liu Chih-chi and Ssu-ma Kuang" (from the now classic symposium volume.
The history officials were educated in Confucian classics but included the notoriously dishonest Hsu Ching-tsung as well as Liu Chih-chi's family of conscientious historians and the supervisors of history projects who often served as chief ministers.
The maverick T'ang critic Liu Chih-chi (661-721) felt that the Shih chi tables needlessly duplicated material in other chapters, and in his Shih t'ung he wrote that "to have them is no benefit, and to omit them would be no loss." Shih t'ung (SPTK), 3.15.