Liu Shaoqi


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Liu Shaoqi

or

Liu Shao-ch'i

(both: lyo͞o shou-chē), 1898?–1969, Chinese Communist political leader. Liu joined (1920) a CominternComintern
[acronym for Communist International], name given to the Third International, founded at Moscow in 1919. Vladimir Ilyich Lenin feared a resurgence of the Second, or Socialist, International under non-Communist leadership.
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 organization in Shanghai, where he studied Russian. While in Moscow in 1921, he joined the Chinese Communist party. After he returned to China, his reputation as a labor organizer grew. He rose rapidly in the party hierarchy, was a member of the central committee in 1927, and in 1934 was promoted to the powerful politburo. Liu became the Communists' foremost expert on organization and party structure. In the 1950s and early 60s he played an important role in all aspects of public life, especially as chairman and head of state of the Chinese People's Republic (1959–68). Attacked during the early stages of the Cultural RevolutionCultural Revolution,
1966–76, mass mobilization of urban Chinese youth inaugurated by Mao Zedong in an attempt to prevent the development of a bureaucratized Soviet style of Communism.
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 (1966–76) as the "number one capitalist-roader," Liu was stripped of power in 1968. He was rehabilitated posthumously in 1980.
References in periodicals archive ?
Top party leaders such as Liu Shaoqi and Deng Xiaoping, who had developed differences with Mao during his great leap forward phase were also punished and humiliated.
In August 1966, Mao published Bombard the Headquarters-My Big-Character Poster, a document aimed at enabling the purge of the Chinese Communist Party's leading capitalist roader-then President Liu Shaoqi.
Although all were guided by socialist ideals, Mao and his opponents, including Liu Shaoqi, Zhou Enlai, and Deng Xiaoping, disagreed about the mechanisms of change and the rate of progress necessary to realize those ideals.
Asi pudo entender que la primera intencion de Mao fue destruir a su unico rival peligroso, Liu Shaoqi (1898-1969), un comunista de temple mas humanitario que, tras la conferencia de Lushan, concentraba las esperanzas de los millones de agraviados por la locura del Gran Salto Adelante.
Later, Mao sent PRC President Liu Shaoqi and Premier Zhou Enlai to deal with the famine, but to no avail.
The Times has treated Herald Tribune's legacy as the communists do photos: Don't like Leon Trotsky standing beside Stalin or Liu Shaoqi beside Mao?
A similar fate awaited Liu Shaoqi, who pops up three or four times, as does Marshal Zhu De.
When Mao Zedong purged his most senior Communist Party boss, Liu Shaoqi, during the Cultural Revolution, Liu's wife was paraded through the streets wearing pingpong balls around her neck as a symbol of wicked decadence and extravagance.
There are indications that critics detained in secrecy between December 2010 and July 2011, including cultural activist Ai Weiwei, were threatened with being "buried alive" or with the fate of former President Liu Shaoqi, who died "with the Constitution in his hands," as reported by Ai Weiwei.
Mao purged his designated successors, Liu Shaoqi and Lin Biao, and all others who might oppose him or his plans.
At that time the influence of Mao was in decline while that of those he termed the "capitalist roaders," such as Liu Shaoqi and Deng Xiaoping, was ascending.
Liu Shaoqi, the party's secondin-command, had a hard time reining in the violence, as a missive from the Hebei archives shows: 'When it comes to the ways in which people are killed, some ate buried alive, some ate executed, some are cut to pieces, and among those who are strangled or mangled to death, some of the bodies are hung from trees or doors.