Liutprand

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Liutprand

(lēo͞ot`prănd), d. 744, king of the Lombards (712–44). Under his rule the Lombard kingdom of Italy reached its zenith. The first Christian Lombard ruler, Liutprand strongly favored Roman law and institutions. His legislation anticipated the reforms of CharlemagneCharlemagne
(Charles the Great or Charles I) [O.Fr.,=Charles the great], 742?–814, emperor of the West (800–814), Carolingian king of the Franks (768–814).
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 by protecting his subjects from denial of justice through special envoys authorized to administer justice and redress grievances. He curbed the powers of the local dukes and bishops, thus creating a centralized state, and he obtained the submission of the duchies of Spoleto and Benevento. In the north, he expanded his dominions at the expense of Bavaria. Liutprand died after attempting to bring Ravenna, which was under Byzantine rule, into his domain. After the brief reigns of Liutprand's nephew Hildeprand and of Ratchis, duke of Friuli, Liutprand's brother Aistulf acceded (749) and took Ravenna in 751.
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When Liudprand came to Constantinople to represent Otto I as the "Emperor of the Romans," Emperor Nicephorus II Phocas replied, "You are not Romans, but Lombards!"
In the end, Yeats's image of the golden bough turned out to have basis in a historical glimmer gathered by ambassador Liudprand of Cremona from one of his visits to Constantinople in the 900s.
(137.) In his antapodosis, he refers, for example, to "ceterae vero, quae sunt sub eodem climate nationes, Armeni scilicet, Perses, Chaldei, Avasgi," LIUDPRAND OF CREMONA, Retribution, in THE COMPLETE WORKS OF LIUDPRAND OF CREMONA 41, 47 (Paolo Squatriti trans., Tomas F.X.
(39.) Liudprand reported on this automaton when sent on a mission to Constantinople in 949.
Squatriti, Paolo, trans., The Complete Works of Liudprand of Cremona.
In the mid-tenth century, Bishops Liudprand of Cremona and Rather of Verona criticized clerics who attended profane performances and games.
Adelbert Davids's article on marriage negotiations between Byzantium and the West from the eighth to the tenth centuries is more pertinent, as Liudprand of Cremona tells us a great deal about the initial diplomatic talks, but Jonathan Shepard's piece on the union of Maria Lekapena and Peter of Bulgaria is not entirely relevant.
Sutherland, "The Idea of Revenge in Lombard Society in the Eighth and Tenth Centuries: The Cases of Paul the Deacon and Liudprand of Cremona", Speculum, 1 (1975), pp.