liverwort

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liverwort,

any plant of the class Marchantiopsida. Mosses and liverworts together comprise the division BryophytaBryophyta
, division of green land plants that includes the mosses (class Bryopsida), the liverworts (Marchantiopsida), and the hornworts (Anthocerotopsida). The liverworts and hornworts are generally inconspicuous plants; common liverworts include species of the genera
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, primitive green land plants (see mossmoss,
any species of the class Bryopsida, in which the liverworts are sometimes included. Mosses and liverworts together comprise the division Bryophyta, the first green land plants to develop in the process of evolution.
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; plantplant,
any organism of the plant kingdom, as opposed to one of the animal kingdom or of the kingdoms Fungi, Protista, or Monera in the five-kingdom system of classification.
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); some of the earliest land plants resembled modern liverworts. In contrast to mosses, most liverworts grow prostrate and consist of a flattened, branching (but undifferentiated) green structure, the thallus; other liverworts produce leafy stems, which are flattened and usually prostrate. The ancients believed that liverworts could cure diseases of the liver, hence the name. They are also called hepatics, and the unrelated flowering plant hepaticahepatica
or liverleaf,
any plant of the genus Hepatica of the family Ranunculaceae (buttercup family), low, woodland, spring wildflowers of the north temperate zone, popular for wild gardens.
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 is frequently called liverwort. Liverworts are classified in the division Bryophyta, class Marchantiopsida.
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liverwort

[′liv·ər‚wȯrt]
(botany)
The common name for members of the Marchantiatae.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

liverwort

any bryophyte plant of the phylum Hepatophyta, growing in wet places and resembling green seaweeds or leafy mosses
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Windborne: Can liverworts be used as indicators of altitudinal gradient in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.
Trasplanting the leafy liverwort Herbertus hutchinsiae: a suitable conservation tool to maintain oceanic-montane liverwort-rich heat?
Recent advances in phytochemistry of bryophytes-acetogenins, terpenoids and bis (bibenzyl)s from selected Japanese, Taiwanese, New Zealand, Argentinean and European liverworts. Phytochem.
In the present study, the diethyl ether extracts of eight different species of the liverworts growing in Turkey (Table 1) were investigated for their in vivo wound healing activity.
This is not an isolated tale; we also know that 86 species of plants (including flowering plants, mosses, liverworts and lichens) have been lost from Wales since the 17th century and this loss of wildlife has continued to this day; corncrakes last bred in Wales in 1980 and in the last 10 years, corn buntings and turtle doves have sadly slipped away too.
In the present day, the reserve includes more than 13,000 samples that have been saved for the purposes of the study and archiving, like Vascular plants (mono and bi-lobe), parasites algae, water algae, liverworts, marine algae and fungi.
The genus Lepidozia belonging to the Porellaceae family of the Class Hepaticae (liverworts) is mainly distributed in tropical and subtropical regions of the southern hemisphere and its species are rich sources of various types of secondary metabolites including isobicyclogermacranes, lepidozanes, cadinanes, eudesmanes, maalianes, vitranes, and bibenzyls (Asakawa et al., 2012).
Otherwise, taxa were identified from published works (Scott and Stone 1976; Catcheside 1980; and Meagher and Fuhrer 2003 for mosses and liverworts, and Filson and Rogers 1979 for lichens).
(2001) the Junger manniales order is the largest of Hepaticae; about 1000 species are present in tropical America; species of this order are plants with leaves and they are therefore called "leafy liverworts".
When a lawn lies wet for any length of time, damp conditions encourage algae, lichens and liverworts. This includes bubble-like Nostoc algae and dog lichen.