Living Newspaper


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Living Newspaper

 

a public presentation, based on newspaper articles or controversial contemporary issues. This type of production was usually presented by amateur dramatic clubs. It grew out of the so-called oral newspaper— the oral presentation of articles and information from the press by one or more readers, which was a widespread practice at the front during the Civil War (1918–20). The living newspaper took shape in the early 1920’s and became one of the most widely used forms of propaganda through art. It included monologues, choral recitation, chastushki (short humorous poems), and topical satire. The first professional group of this kind, the Blue Blouse, was formed in 1923. The traditions of this genre were revived in the 1960’s and 1970’s by the so-called oral journals.

REFERENCE

Lobova, N., ajid E. Permiak. Zhivaia teatralizovannaia gazeta. Moscow-Leningrad, 1932.
References in periodicals archive ?
Supreme Court upholds the constitutionality of the Tennessee Valley Authority, leading the Living Newspaper program to revise its play about the TVA controversy, Power.
Each week for ten weeks, Cyrano's Theatre Company presents a different decade in Anchorage in the form of a living newspaper, highlighting the headline stories and colorful characters of the day, with authentic music of the period and film clips.
In The Designer as Activist, Essin observes that "modern design, as enacted by many theatre artists during the early twentieth century, not only visually interpreted dramatic texts and critiqued cultural landscapes but also promoted concrete social agendas." Her case studies examine the ways in which designers engaged with politically driven organizations--theatre companies, trade unions, and government agencies: Robert Edmund Jones with the Paterson Strike Pageant; Aline Bernstein, the first female designer in the USAA, at the Neighborhood Playhouse and with the International Ladies Garment Workers Union; and Howard Bay's work on Power (1937), a Federal Theatre Project for the Living Newspaper unit.
He brought back to the United States ideas and concepts which he would first employ on the New York stage, notably in his two federally-funded Living Newspaper productions in 1936.
Two historical essays focus on British versions of the Living Newspaper, a documentary form developed in revolutionary Russia and later adopted by the American Federal Theatre Project in order to address contemporary events.
Optative's extensive website (Google Sinking Neptune) features the deconstructed text--a mixture of agit-prop and living newspaper documentary theatre forms--a brief video of its performance and Donovan King's thirty-page "dramaturgical toolbox" analysis of the play that rivals Wasserman's.
Braunowna in the "Living Newspaper Show," a witty chronicle of ghetto
In 1977, I bought Lakehead Living Newspaper and ran it for more than 15 years.
Less an actual play than a living newspaper of sorts, a docu-drama refracted through a playwright's penchant for the distillation required to build theatrical tension, "The Permanent Way" itself builds toward a threnody of regret and rage--regret for the England that once was and could still be again, rage at the comprehensive disregard of British officialdom for a public who must stand by as profit is seen to take precedence over human lives not once but four times.
Fo's central character (Fool) fills the medieval jester's function as a living newspaper. This unusual approach was necessary, Fo wrote later, because his play was "an exercise in counter-information.
A brutal and upsetting prison drama, Not About Nightingales packs a three-part punch: It's a 1930s-style "living newspaper" expose of inhumane prison conditions; it's an early study of themes that would emerge full-blown in The Glass Menagerie and A Streetcar Named Desire; and it's a powerhouse dramatic spectacle staged by Trevor Nunn, world famous for directing Cats and Sunset Boulevard.