Livland


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Livland: Inflants

Livland

 

the German name for Livonia. From the second half of the 16th century, after the collapse of the Livonian confederation, Livland encompassed the southern part of present-day Estonia and northern Latvia as far as the Daugava River. The country was a dependency of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

After the Truce of Altmark in 1629, southern Estonia and the contiguous part of Latvia as far south as the Daugava River and its tributary, the Aiviekste River, became a province under Swedish rule (Lettish, Vidzeme; Estonian, Liivimaa). By the Treaty of Nystadt in 1721, Livland was incorporated into Russia as the Province of Livonia. After the Great October Socialist Revolution, the southern part of the province became part of Latvia, and the northern part was incorporated into Estonia. The population of the region consists of Letts and Estonians.

References in periodicals archive ?
Bengt Gottfried Forselius had a somewhat different background from the clerical linguistic scholars operating in Estland and Livland in the 17th century (Poldvee 2010a).
Pracirika--Puozu-, Riga 2010; Materialien 1836--Materialien zu einer Geschichte der Landguter Livlands gesammelt von Heinrich von Hagemeister, Riga 1836; ME I--IV--K.
Man gi hier dagegen offen zu erkennen, die Interessen am Gewinn von Reval wAaAaAeAnren denen von LAaAaAeA beck de facto sehr AaAaAeAnhnlich, was ein solides Fun fAaAaAeA r ihre Zusammenarbeit bei Handelsangelegenheiten in Livland und Russla sein mAaAaAeA ge.
Der Jahrzehnte andauernde Livlandische Krieg fuhrte zum Aussterben der livischen Sprache in Livland.
The first professor of the Chair of the History, Statistics and Geography of Russia, especially of Estland, Livland, Kurland and Finland was Adam Christian Gaspari (1752-1830) (Levickij 1903:505-510, Siilivask 1982:160, 163, Hiio and Piirimae 2007:180), who worked in Tartu in 1803-1809.
Migration to Russia was common for Estonians in the second half of the 19th century, particularly peasants from Estland province; Estonians from Livland to the south were wealthier and less likely to leave.
One of the major failings in the historiography of the Baltic Provinces of the Russian Empire (Estland, Livland, and Kurland) has been the tendency to focus too narrowly on a given nationality--typically, the Germans, Estonians, or Latvians--and to view its development in isolation from the multiethnic and multicultural context of the region.
1991, Uber die Grenze zwischen Estland und Livland und ihre Bedeutung fur die Agrar- und Religionsgeschichte.