Lobby


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lobby

1. a room or corridor used as an entrance hall, vestibule, etc.
2. Chiefly Brit a hall in a legislative building used for meetings between the legislators and members of the public
3. Chiefly Brit one of two corridors in a legislative building in which members vote
4. a group of persons who attempt to influence legislators on behalf of a particular interest

Lobby

A space at the entrance to a building, theater, hotel, or other structure.

Lobby

 

auxiliary premises in parliamentary and other government buildings, as well as in theaters and concert halls, designed for rest during breaks between sessions or during intermissions. Lobbies are also used for unofficial meetings and exchange of opinions and often serve as work areas for journalists. The expression “lobbying” characterizes behind-the-scenes deals made in capitalist legislative institutions by representatives of the ruling circles who are close to members of the institutions or to high government officials.


Lobby

 

the system of offices and agencies of the major monopolies assigned to legislative bodies of the USA. Lobbies exert direct pressure on legislators and state officials even to the point of bribery for the sake of the companies involved.

lobby

A space at the entrance to a building, theater, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
David Rosser, the Western Mail's former lobby editor, gave us a personal glimpse of life in the Lobby 50 years ago in his 1987 memoir A Dragon in the House: 'It was...in a sense a much more casual life, especially on the output side.
'My deputies and I are very optimistic about allowing the media to remain in the Dewan Rakyat lobby. However, without the good cooperation of the media, we are afraid that these good improvements will have to be withdrawn one day if the media continues to ignore rules and instructions by insisting on conducting interviews and asking questions outside the allocated area,' he added.
and Horja, A., Reglementarea activitatii de Lobby. In anticamera influentei (Regulation of Lobbying Activity.
The UK financial services lobby is very active in Brussels.
Sometimes called the Jewish lobby -- wrongly, in my opinion because not all American Jews are supportive of Israel -- the pro-Israel lobby is indeed a very powerful actor in Congress and exerts significant influence over the administration through the presence of organizations such as the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC).
Remodeling an existing lobby can be done beautifully, with updated designs based on straightforward solutions.
Continue reading "Israel Spent $1,250 To Lobby America in 2013, So Why Is Everyone Obsessed With The Israel Lobby?" at...
Specifically, in the FMSI branch lobby study of 344,000 interactions, FMSI found that on average 65% of the platform activities do not involve selling products.
"Your lobby is your front door--it's the first and last impression for your employees, tenants, and their customers," explains Charles McClafferty, chief operating officer with Sage Realty Corporation in New York City.
Nurses who arrived early at Lobby Day had a chance to network.
The US public gets an incomplete picture of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict because powerful pro-Israeli lobby, backed by Evangelicals, has effectively gagged the US media, said two leading US academics.
It even survived the most profound changes to Canada's lobbying laws, the Federal Accountability Act, Prime Minister Harper's flagship legislation designed to, in his words, enable Canadians to "trust their federal government." Even though the premise of legitimacy was reaffirmed, the Harper government's changes to the lobbying law--scheduled to come fully into force on July 1, 2008--sent a profound message to those who lobby the federal government.