Sarcopterygii

(redirected from Lobe-finned)

Sarcopterygii

[sär‚käp·tə′rij·ē‚ī]
(vertebrate zoology)
A subclass of Osteichthyes, including Crossopterygii and Dipnoi in some systems of classification.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fossils embedded in South African rocks that date back 320 million years offer evidence of lobe-finned fish (the same family as coelacanths).
Bichirs don't belong to the broad group of lobe-finned fishes that gave rise to land-dwelling vertebrates.
Evolution of the lobe-finned fish from about 40 million years ago could have led to the first land-dwelling vertebrate animals, suggest researchers.
They discovered that Eusthenopteron, a Devonian (370 million year old) lobe-finned fish from Miguasha in Canada that is closely related to the first tetrapods, already exhibited typical marrow processes inside its humerus (upper arm bone).
A lobe-finned fish with a broad flat head and sharp teeth, Tiktlik looked like a cross between a fish and a crocodile, growing up to a length of 9 feet as it hunted in shallow freshwater environments.
Believed to be descended from lobe-finned fishes, modern amphibians are divided into three groups--frogs and toads, salamanders, and caecilians.
It features a lobe-finned fish holding a bat while it and several others look up at a baseball sitting on a dry beach.
These were predatory lobe-finned fish which could reach seven metres in length, making it the largest freshwater fish known.
Some 400 million years ago, the first lobe-finned fish crept out of the sea and stayed out.
Coelacanth The prehistoric-looking, lobe-finned fish's genome revealed that it is not the closest living relative to land-traversing tetrapods--lungfish take that title (SN: 5/18/13, p.
One lineage led to the ray-finned fishes, or actinopterygians, and the other to lobe-finned fishes, or sarcopterygians; the latter gave rise to land vertebrates, Bemis explained.
Lobe-finned fishes evolved legs while still in the water.