Lobengula


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Lobengula

(lō'bĕng-go͞o`lə), c.1833–94, king of Matabeleland (now in Zimbabwe). After succeeding his father (1870), he tried to turn aside the approaches of European colonizers. In 1888, however, under pressure from Cecil RhodesRhodes, Cecil John
, 1853–1902, British imperialist and business magnate. Business Career

The son of a Hertfordshire clergyman, he first went to South Africa in 1870, joining his oldest brother, Herbert, on a cotton plantation in Natal.
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, he ceded his mineral rights in exchange for small payment, and Rhodes used those concessions to form the British South Africa Company (1889). When British gold miners began appearing, Lobengula rallied his people and in 1893 attacked the British. The results were disastrous for the NdebeleNdebele
or Matabele
, Bantu-speaking people inhabiting Matabeleland North and South, W Zimbabwe. The Ndebele, now numbering close to 2 million, originated as a tribal following in 1823, when Mzilikazi, a general under the Zulu king Shaka, fled with a number of warriors
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 (Matabele); Lobengula died while fleeing north.

Lobengula

 

Born circa 1836; died 1894. Inkosi (ruler, supreme chief) of the Matabele people. The last powerful independent African ruler in Southern Africa (1870–94).

During the 1880’s Lobengula attempted to exploit the conflicts between Great Britain, Germany, and the Transvaal in the area between the Zambezi and Limpopo rivers, using diplomacy to retard imperialist expansion in the region. In 1888 he was compelled to conclude a “friendship treaty” with Great Britain and a “treaty” with agents of C. Rhodes, granting concessions for mineral resources in his country. He led the Matabele liberation struggle in 1893.

REFERENCE

Davidson, A. B. Matabele i mashona ν bor’be protiv angliiskoi kolonizatsii, 1888–1897. Moscow, 1958.

Lobengula

?1836--94, last Matabele king (1870--93); his kingdom was destroyed by the British
References in periodicals archive ?
Shortly afterwards Lobengula died under mysterious circumstances.
Ngwahi Bhebe, Lobengula of Zimbabwe (London: Heinemann, 1977), 39-42; Nancy Rouillard, ed.
The assertion about the Lobengula congregation being the largest of the BIC certainly calls for caution in the absence of any statistics for purposes of comparison.
King Mzilikazi died in 1868 and was succeeded by a son, Lobengula, at a stage when European explorers and prospectors were identifying the country's gold deposits, including the gold diggings of the early inhabitants.
When president Kruger visits their chieftain Lobengula to confront him about his involvement with the British, he proudly but naively proclaims, "Lobengula is not a Christian anymore.
One of these, On Trial for My Country, (5) retelling the efforts of the Ndebele king, Lobengula, to resist Rhodes, carries a depiction of land that is imbued with spiritual as well as historical force.
On that day clusters of women were dotted round the Lobengula Shopping Mall, it was a warm sunshiny day although it was winter.
In 1899 Prince Lobengula, allegedly the heir to the throne of Matabeleland, appeared in the hugely popular 'Savage South Africa' at Earls Court.
99 [pounds sterling]) follows the scandal surrounding the love affair between a Cornish lady and Prince Peter Lobengula, star of an 1890s show in London called `Savage South Africa'.
Lobengula later insisted that he had not understood what he had signed.
Many whites' lives have hardly changed since Cecil Rhodes cheated their King Lobengula of their land in 1893: the same land which is the crux of the current dispute.
This once proud tribe, the descendants of the great Zulu leaders Shaka, Mzillkazi and Lobengula, had been treated very badly by Mugabe's Shona majority, and in spite of the much vaunted unity accord between Joshua Nkomo's Zapu and Mugabe's Zanu the Ndebele welcomed the non-tribal MDC with much enthusiasm.