Lobengula


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Lobengula

(lō'bĕng-go͞o`lə), c.1833–94, king of Matabeleland (now in Zimbabwe). After succeeding his father (1870), he tried to turn aside the approaches of European colonizers. In 1888, however, under pressure from Cecil RhodesRhodes, Cecil John
, 1853–1902, British imperialist and business magnate. Business Career

The son of a Hertfordshire clergyman, he first went to South Africa in 1870, joining his oldest brother, Herbert, on a cotton plantation in Natal.
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, he ceded his mineral rights in exchange for small payment, and Rhodes used those concessions to form the British South Africa Company (1889). When British gold miners began appearing, Lobengula rallied his people and in 1893 attacked the British. The results were disastrous for the NdebeleNdebele
or Matabele
, Bantu-speaking people inhabiting Matabeleland North and South, W Zimbabwe. The Ndebele, now numbering close to 2 million, originated as a tribal following in 1823, when Mzilikazi, a general under the Zulu king Shaka, fled with a number of warriors
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 (Matabele); Lobengula died while fleeing north.

Lobengula

 

Born circa 1836; died 1894. Inkosi (ruler, supreme chief) of the Matabele people. The last powerful independent African ruler in Southern Africa (1870–94).

During the 1880’s Lobengula attempted to exploit the conflicts between Great Britain, Germany, and the Transvaal in the area between the Zambezi and Limpopo rivers, using diplomacy to retard imperialist expansion in the region. In 1888 he was compelled to conclude a “friendship treaty” with Great Britain and a “treaty” with agents of C. Rhodes, granting concessions for mineral resources in his country. He led the Matabele liberation struggle in 1893.

REFERENCE

Davidson, A. B. Matabele i mashona ν bor’be protiv angliiskoi kolonizatsii, 1888–1897. Moscow, 1958.

Lobengula

?1836--94, last Matabele king (1870--93); his kingdom was destroyed by the British
References in classic literature ?
At Inyati, the outlying trading station in the Matabele country, of which Lobengula (a great and cruel scoundrel) is king, with many regrets we parted from our comfortable wagon.
Francis Thompson, the Yorkshireman used by Cecil Rhodes to trick Lobengula to hand over his kingdom to the Perfidious Albion in 1888, records in his half-finished book (which his daughter completed and published in 1936; Thompson died in 1927) that the huge disagreement within the Ndebele royal family was about which of two candidates--Lobengula and Nkulumani, both sons of the recently deceased King Mzilikazi--should ascend the throne.
1890-1897), the whites saw Lobengula as a local point of resistance (Ndlovu-Gatsheni 2009).
The first step north was towards the Zambezi, where in 1888 his representatives obtained mining concessions from the Ndebele king, Lobengula, in return for 1,000 rifles--mostly surplus Snider-Enfields and later some Martini-Henrys--and a "monthly rent" of [pounds sterling]100.
The first volume (published in 1979) described the establishment of a Jesuit house near Gubuluwayo (in what is now Zimbabwe), the capital of Lobengula, chief of the Ndebele.
In 1888 Lobengula, the Ndebele ruler of the region that is now Zimbabwe, signed an agreement, granting mineral rights to the British South African Company, which then occupies most of the territory, calling it Rhodesia.
Meredith's narrative is heavily researched yet comes alive with colorful portrayals of personalities ranging from rakish prospector Cecil Rhodes (founder of the DeBeers company) who absconded with a fortune manipulating diamond and gold markets, to nationalists like Paul Kruger who fought tirelessly for their land and people, to native kings like Lobengula who were trapped amid the Europeans' struggle.
The assertion about the Lobengula congregation being the largest of the BIC certainly calls for caution in the absence of any statistics for purposes of comparison.
King Mzilikazi died in 1868 and was succeeded by a son, Lobengula, at a stage when European explorers and prospectors were identifying the country's gold deposits, including the gold diggings of the early inhabitants.
One of these, On Trial for My Country, (5) retelling the efforts of the Ndebele king, Lobengula, to resist Rhodes, carries a depiction of land that is imbued with spiritual as well as historical force.
On that day clusters of women were dotted round the Lobengula Shopping Mall, it was a warm sunshiny day although it was winter.
In 1899 Prince Lobengula, allegedly the heir to the throne of Matabeleland, appeared in the hugely popular 'Savage South Africa' at Earls Court.