Lobengula


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Lobengula

(lō'bĕng-go͞o`lə), c.1833–94, king of Matabeleland (now in Zimbabwe). After succeeding his father (1870), he tried to turn aside the approaches of European colonizers. In 1888, however, under pressure from Cecil RhodesRhodes, Cecil John
, 1853–1902, British imperialist and business magnate. Business Career

The son of a Hertfordshire clergyman, he first went to South Africa in 1870, joining his oldest brother, Herbert, on a cotton plantation in Natal.
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, he ceded his mineral rights in exchange for small payment, and Rhodes used those concessions to form the British South Africa Company (1889). When British gold miners began appearing, Lobengula rallied his people and in 1893 attacked the British. The results were disastrous for the NdebeleNdebele
or Matabele
, Bantu-speaking people inhabiting Matabeleland North and South, W Zimbabwe. The Ndebele, now numbering close to 2 million, originated as a tribal following in 1823, when Mzilikazi, a general under the Zulu king Shaka, fled with a number of warriors
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 (Matabele); Lobengula died while fleeing north.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Lobengula

 

Born circa 1836; died 1894. Inkosi (ruler, supreme chief) of the Matabele people. The last powerful independent African ruler in Southern Africa (1870–94).

During the 1880’s Lobengula attempted to exploit the conflicts between Great Britain, Germany, and the Transvaal in the area between the Zambezi and Limpopo rivers, using diplomacy to retard imperialist expansion in the region. In 1888 he was compelled to conclude a “friendship treaty” with Great Britain and a “treaty” with agents of C. Rhodes, granting concessions for mineral resources in his country. He led the Matabele liberation struggle in 1893.

REFERENCE

Davidson, A. B. Matabele i mashona ν bor’be protiv angliiskoi kolonizatsii, 1888–1897. Moscow, 1958.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Lobengula

?1836--94, last Matabele king (1870--93); his kingdom was destroyed by the British
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
When Lobengula ruled the land it wore a mantle green, With verdure rich were clothed the hills, And streamlets ran in gleaming rills, Erosion was not seen.
Well, I have a word for them: In 1904, one of Lobengula's indunas encountered Francis Thompson, six years after the Perfidious Albion had taken over the Ndebele kingdom: "Ou Tomoson," the induna said, "how have you treated us, after all your promises, which we believed." South Africa, you have a history!
In 1893 the BSAP intervened in an internal Ndebele power struggle which led to the First Matabele War, during which Lobengula's warriors attack white settlements, inflicting a number of casaualties.
LOBENGULA (3.50 Great Leighs) was a bitter disappointment on his previous start, but it's likely there was something wrong with him at the time and trainer Ian McInnes has almost certainly done the right thing by giving him a rest.
WOLVERHAMPTON: 7.00 Sir Joey, 7.30 Arondo, 7.55 Cha Cha Cha, 8.25 King Of Dixie, 8.55 Lobengula, 9.20 Brandywell Boy.
WOLVERHAMPTON: 7.00 Golden Dane, 7.30 Animator, 7.55 Arthur's Edge, 8.25 Spiritofthetiger, 8.55 Carcinetto, 9.20 Lobengula.
NAOMI MATTHEW: 7.00 Golden Dane, 7.30 Animator, 7.55 Arthur's Edge, 8.25 Spiritofthetiger, 8.55 Carcinetto, 9.20 Lobengula.
Such was the manner of Lobengula's easeddown romp at Wolverhampton last Thursday, a 6lb penalty may not be enough to prevent him landing a course double in the Hotel & Conferencing At Wolverhampton Handicap.
Meredith's narrative is heavily researched yet comes alive with colorful portrayals of personalities ranging from rakish prospector Cecil Rhodes (founder of the DeBeers company) who absconded with a fortune manipulating diamond and gold markets, to nationalists like Paul Kruger who fought tirelessly for their land and people, to native kings like Lobengula who were trapped amid the Europeans' struggle.
Such was the manner of Lobengula's eased-down romp at Wolverhampton last Thursday, a 6lb penalty may not be enough to prevent him landing a course double in the Hotel & Conferencing At Wolverhampton Handicap.
Meredith writes captivatingly of characters like DeBeer's founder, Cecil Rhodes, native king Lobengula, and nationalist Paul Kruger.