local sidereal time


Also found in: Acronyms.

local sidereal time

(LST) The sidereal time at a particular location. A celestial object crosses the local meridian when the LST is equal to the object's right ascension. The local mean sideral time (LMST) is equal to the Greenwich mean sideral time plus four minutes for each degree of longitude that the location is east of Greenwich, four minutes being subtracted for each degree west. The local apparent sideral time (LAST) is obtained by adding the equation of the equinoxes (see sidereal time) to the LMST.

local sidereal time

[′lō·kəl sə¦dir·ē·əl ¦tīm]
(astronomy)
The arc of the celestial equator, or the angle at the celestial pole which is between the upper branch of the local celestial meridian and the hour circle of the vernal equinox.
References in periodicals archive ?
Association between effect size in free response anomalous cognition experiments and local sidereal time. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 11, 109-122.
The local sidereal time for the observation of [v.sub.a] (i.e., the right ascension of the absolute velocity's apex) was calculated in the following manner: As for any day the sidereal time increases by [4.sup.m] (with respect to the solar time), the sidereal time at midnight on the 11th February (which follows 21 days after midnight on the 21 January) was [8.sup.h] + [1.sup.h] [24.sup.m] = = [9.sup.h] [24.sup.m].
I now establish that when calculating the local sidereal time of observation of [v.sub.a] for my interferometric "coupled mirrors" experiment [2, 6, 8, 9], I made a very unpleasant error.
This corresponds to a local sidereal time of 17.5[+ or -]2 hrs.
16 the orientation of the detector arm relative to the Earth rotation axis and the Miller flow direction, at two key local sidereal times. So we now have a very inexpensive gravitational wave detector sufficiently small that even a coaxial-cable three-arm detector could easily be located within a building.
For almost any sky condition -- whether the zenith magnitude limit is 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, or 6.5 -- the greatest star numbers are seen at a local sidereal time (LST) near |4.sup.h~ to |6.sup.h~.
ABSTRACT: The basis of the present study was findings by Spottiswoode (1997a, 1997b) showing that Anomalous Cognition (AC) effect size appears to be associated with Local Sidereal Time (LST) and that correlations between AC effect size and Global Geomagnetic Field (GMF) fluctuations appear to vary with LST.
Spottiswoode (1997b) recently demonstrated that the strength of this negative correlation depends on the local sidereal time (LST) where and when the subject is taking the ESP test.
Our data confirm (though not independently, since they are included in Spottiswoode's much larger data set) that the relationship between ESP and geomagnetic variation is much stronger during a roughly two-hour window of local sidereal time surrounding 13.5 hours LST.
Recently it has been shown that there is a relationship between free-response effect size and the Local Sidereal Time (LST) at which a trial occurs (Spottiswoode, 1997).
However the timing of the maxima/minima permitted the Right Ascension (RA) of the direction of [upsilon] to be determined, as the direction of propagation is changed by rotation, and the result agreed with that found by Miller; see [6] for plots of the Krisher data plotted against local sidereal times.
In addition to much useful and factual information, complete with descriptive sketches, McMoneagle provides a Glossary of Terms and several scientific papers by James Spottiswoode detailing research into conditions that might affect the quality of remote viewing, such as certain local sidereal times and geomagnetic fluctuations.

Full browser ?