Local Supercluster


Also found in: Acronyms.

Local Supercluster

A huge flattened cloud of galaxies and clusters of galaxies that is centered on or near the Virgo cluster and contains the Local Group (including our Galaxy) as an outlying member. Its radius is believed to be about 30 megaparsecs. Although its reality was for long in doubt, the discovery of other superclusters has convinced most astronomers that the Local Supercluster is a true physical system. The Local Group is moving toward Virgo at a velocity of 250–300 km s–1 in what is known as the virgocentric flow.

Local Supercluster

[′lō·kəl ′sü·pər‚kləs·tər]
(astronomy)
A great flattened system of groups and clusters of galaxies, about 1.5 to 2 × 108 light-years (1.4 to 1.9 × 1024 meters) across, which includes the local group of galaxies and the Virgo Cluster. Also known as Virgo Supercluster.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on work by Gerard de Vaucouleurs in the 1950s, astronomers have thought of our galaxy as being on the edge of the so-called Local Supercluster, a structure about 100 million light-years wide that's centered on the Virgo Cluster.
This newly discovered concentration of clusters packed with galaxies falls on a line nearly a billion light-years long that also runs through the Great Attractor, the local supercluster (which includes our own galaxy) and another large aggregation known as the Perseus-Pisces supercluster.
The Milky Way and our Local Group of galaxies lie in the outer fringe of the Virgo Cluster's extended domain (known as the Local Supercluster), so we may be part of the same filament ourselves.
Our Local Group resides in the outskirts of the Local Supercluster, first identified in the early 1950s by Gerard de Vaucouleurs, which has the Virgo Cluster as its core.
They were even found associated with our own local supercluster of galaxies in the direction of the constellation Virgo.
Gallagher (University of Wisconsin), their search for these objects in the local supercluster revealed not only spirals and dwarf irregulars, but also some possibly interacting systems as well as rare miniature spirals.
It is the center of what cosmologists call the Local Supercluster, which includes the Milky Way on its fringe.

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