local anaesthetic

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local anaesthetic

Med a drug that produces local anaesthesia
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This drug should not be used in patients with confirmed allergic hypersensitivity to amide local anaesthetics. Also in the case of the second and third degree heart block, severe liver and kidney damage and epilepsy, one should proceed with great caution [3].
Improved conduction blockade in surgery and obstetrics: carbonated local anaesthetics. Can Med Assoc J 1967;97(23):1377-84.
Administration of intraperitoneal and periportal local anaesthetics employing bupivacaine during surgery is used by many clinicians to effectively decrease postoperative pain.
AAGBI Safety Guideline: Management of Severe Local Anaesthetic Toxicity 2010; Available from URL: http://www.aagbi.org/sites/default/files/la_toxicity_2010_pdf.
Major treatments can be offered through a keyhole in the artery/vein in the groin or the wrist and under local anaesthetics. These include: Unblocking the coronary arteries and deploying stents in patients with angina or acute heart attack, closing holes in the heart (ASD/VSD) with special devices, replacing the narrowed or incompetent aortic valve (TAVI) and iplanting devices in a small chamber of the heart (left atrial appendage) with irregular heart rhythm (atrial fibrilation) for life.
On further enquiry into history, it was noted that the child bit the swelling following local anaesthetic administration for four to five hours as her lip felt swollen and numb.
Local anaesthetics often used in peripheral nerve blocks, provide surgical anaesthesia and postoperative analgesia by blocking signals to the dorsal horn.
Local anaesthetic solution injected into the subarachnoid space blocks conduction of impulses along all nerves with which it comes in contact.
Cox B, Durieux ME, Marcus MAE 2003 Toxicity of local anaesthetics Best Practice & Research Clinical Anaesthesiology 17 (1) 111-36
Local anaesthetics interfere indirectly with neuromuscular transmission by inhibiting acetylcholine release or by changing the acetylcholine receptor to depress muscle excitability (1,9-12).
Washington, July 8 (ANI): Local anaesthetics are likely to have potential therapeutic effects on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to a new study.
Local anaesthetics cause reversible blockade of impulse propagation along the nerve fibres by preventing the influx of sodium ions through the cell membrane of the fibres.