Lockhart, Robert Hamilton Bruce

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Lockhart, Robert Hamilton Bruce

 

Born Sept. 2, 1887, in London; died 1970 in London. Agent of the British diplomatic service. Journalist.

From 1912 to September 1917, Lockhart served in Moscow as the vice-consul and general consul of Great Britain. From January to September 1918 he headed the special British mission accredited with the Soviet government. He was exposed by the All-Russian Extraordinary Commission (All-Russian Cheka) as the organizer of espionage and of an anti-Soviet conspiracy of international imperialists. In August 1918 he was arrested and in October 1918 deported from Soviet Russia. In 1928 he became a professional journalist (for the Evening Standard). At the beginning of World War II, Lockhart was one of the directors of the department of political intelligence of the British Foreign Office (1939–40). He was the British representative to the provisional Czech government in London (1940–41) and director of the committee on political warfare, which was responsible for propaganda and intelligence (1941–45). He wrote a number of books, including memoirs on his stay in Soviet Russia.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.