Locris


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Locris

(lō`krĭs), region of central Greece. The state was probably in existence before the arrival of the Phocians. The rise of Doris and Phocis split the original region into western and eastern portions. Eastern Locris, along the Malian Gulf (now Maliakós Kolpós) and Gulf of Euboea (now Vórios Evvoïkós Kolpós) between Thermopylae and Larymna, was again split (6th cent. B.C.) by Phocis into Epicnemedian in the west and Opuntian in the east. Western, or Ozolaean, Locris was on the north coast of the Gulf of Corinth and had for its principal towns Amphissa (now Ámfissa) and Naupactus (now Návpaktos). Largely hemmed in by stronger states, the Locrians played a minor role in Greek history. However, they founded (c.700 B.C.) one of the earliest Greek colonies in S Italy, Epizephyrian Locris near the promontory of Zephyrium; it was in the toe of the peninsula. The earliest written legal code in Europe, attributed to Zaleucus (7th cent. B.C.), was used there.

Locris

 

in ancient times, the region in central Greece that was inhabited by Locrian tribes. It consisted of two parts, separated from each other by Phocis and Doris. On the southern coast of the Strait of Euboea and the Malian Gulf lived the Opuntian and Hypocnemedian Locrians, and on the northern coast of the Corinthian Gulf, the Ozolian Locrians. The major cities in Locris were Naupactus, Amphissa (in Ozolian Locris), and Opus. The Opuntian Locrians founded the colony of Locri Epizephyrii in southern Italy in the seventh century B.C. Locris was one of the more backward regions of Greece. Parts of the region were frequently subjugated by Athens, Thebes, the Aetolian League, and other Greek states. In the second century B.C., the Locrian communities united to form the Locrian League, dissolved by the Romans in 146 B.C.

Locris

, Lokris
an ancient region of central Greece
References in periodicals archive ?
Epizephyrian Locri is a no man's land for classicists.
Yet the speaker's calm philosophical attitude presents the death of Locris the puppy as neither heroic nor trivial, but as simply part of a natural process to which all life is subject.
In Greek legend, son of Oileus, king of Locris. In spite of his small stature, he held his own among the other heroes before Troy; but he was also boastful, arrogant, and quarrelsome.
|Led on by this advice, and trusting his own luck', he did not await light-armed troops from Locris but marched straight inland and gave battle - as everyone knows, with disastrous results.
A colleague of the Phocian general Philomelus, he led the Phocian withdrawal from central Greece after the Boeotians and the Amphictyonic Council defeated them at Neon (late 354); appointed commander in chief after Philomelus' death, he used the Delphic treasury to hire mercenaries and to buy the support of Lycophron of Pherae (near Velestinon); campaigned successfully in Locris, Doria, and Boeotia at the head of a large army (353); made alliances with Sparta, Athens, Corinth, and Achaea; defeated and killed by Philip II of Macedon, champion of the Amphictyonic League, at the battle of Volo (352).