Locus

(redirected from Locus ceruleus)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to Locus ceruleus: Raphe nuclei

locus

1. (in many legal phrases) a place or area, esp the place where something occurred
2. Maths a set of points whose location satisfies or is determined by one or more specified conditions
3. Genetics the position of a particular gene on a chromosome

Locus

 

a linear section of a chromosome occupied by a gene.

Using genetic and cytological methods, it is possible to determine the location of a gene, that is, to find which chromosome contains the given gene and its locus, or position in relation to other genes on the same chromosome. It has been demonstrated in some microorganisms that genes that control a particular sequence of biochemical reactions are found in neighboring loci, which are arranged in the same order as the order in which the reactions occur. This has not been established for higher organisms. The term “locus” is sometimes used in the literature as a synonym for the terms “gene” and “cistron.”

locus

[′lō·kəs]
(genetics)
The fixed position of a gene in a chromosome, occupied by allele.
(mathematics)
A collection of points in a Euclidean space whose coordinates satisfy one or more algebraic conditions.

Locus

A distributed system project supporting transparent access to data through a network-wide file system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Botterblom et al., "Increased activity of surviving locus ceruleus neurons in Alzheimer's disease," Annals of Neurology, vol.
The picture of melancholic depression espoused by Gold and his colleagues is that the locus ceruleus and CRH systems, once activated, reinforce each other and activate the stress-response system.
Descending projections of the raphe nuclei are small and include projections to the locus ceruleus, while ascending connections of the raphe nuclei include the hippocampus.[7]
These systems include the ANS, limbic system, basal ganglia and two extrathalamic cortical modulatory systems, the raphe nuclei and locus ceruleus. These systems collectively are involved in the promotion of homeostasis and survival of the organism.
Norepinephrine is the primary neurotransmitter for postganglionic sympathetic neurons and for projecting pathways from the locus ceruleus to the cerebral cortex, spinal cord and cerebellum.
Lance theorized that activation of the locus ceruleus, a small blue colored area in the pons, may be a cause of vascular headaches.
The locus ceruleus offers a tempting explanation of the clumsiness of an intoxicated person.
Catecholamine changes in the locus ceruleus, a basis for therapy," Advances in Neurology, vol.
Englund, "Locus ceruleus degeneration is ubiquitous in Alzheimer's disease: possible implications for diagnosis and treatment," Neuropathology, vol.
Boyle et al., "Neural reserve, neuronal density in the locus ceruleus, and cognitive decline," Neurology, vol.