Locus

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Related to Locus coeruleus: Raphe nuclei

locus

1. (in many legal phrases) a place or area, esp the place where something occurred
2. Maths a set of points whose location satisfies or is determined by one or more specified conditions
3. Genetics the position of a particular gene on a chromosome

Locus

 

a linear section of a chromosome occupied by a gene.

Using genetic and cytological methods, it is possible to determine the location of a gene, that is, to find which chromosome contains the given gene and its locus, or position in relation to other genes on the same chromosome. It has been demonstrated in some microorganisms that genes that control a particular sequence of biochemical reactions are found in neighboring loci, which are arranged in the same order as the order in which the reactions occur. This has not been established for higher organisms. The term “locus” is sometimes used in the literature as a synonym for the terms “gene” and “cistron.”

locus

[′lō·kəs]
(genetics)
The fixed position of a gene in a chromosome, occupied by allele.
(mathematics)
A collection of points in a Euclidean space whose coordinates satisfy one or more algebraic conditions.

Locus

A distributed system project supporting transparent access to data through a network-wide file system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bloom, "Activity of norepinephrine-containing locus coeruleus neurons in behaving rats anticipates fluctuations in the sleep-waking cycle," Journal of Neuroscience: The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience, vol.
Lee, "Tau pathology spread in PS19 tau transgenic mice following locus coeruleus (LC) injections of synthetic tau fibrils is determined by the LC's afferent and efferent connections," Acta Neuropathologica, vol.
Ito, "Norepinephrine and its metabolites are involved in the synthesis of neuromelanin derived from the locus coeruleus," Journal of Neurochemistry, vol.
Mesulam, "Locus coeruleus neurofibrillary degeneration in aging, mild cognitive impairment and early Alzheimer's disease," Neurobiology of Aging, vol.
Italics font style: decreased activity of LC; roman font style: increased activity of LC; Acup., Acupoints; AHI, Ergen; CFA, Complete Freund's Adjuvant; DBH, Dopamine-P-hydroxylase; Durat., duration; EA, electroacupuncture; Freq, frequency; IHC, immunohistochemistry; LC, Locus Coeruleus; L14, Hegu; SJ05, Wai Guan; TE8, Sanyangluo; ST36, Zusanli; FLI, Fos-Like Immunoreactive; fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging; GV20, Baihui; GB30, Huan Tiao; TH, tyrosine hydroxylase.
Elevated agonist binding to [alpha]2-adrenoreceptors in the locus coeruleus in major depression.
Nestler, "A novelaction of morphine in the rat locus coeruleus: persistent decrease in adenylate cyclase," Molecular Pharmacology, vol.
Posteriormente, la senal dolorosa toma diferentes caminos dirigidos a la sustancia gris periacueductal, los nucleos del rafe, el locus coeruleus y el nucleo salivatorio superior.
Locus coeruleus lesions suppress the seizure-attenuating effects of vagus nerve stimulation.
Serotoninergic cell bodies located in the raphe nucleus in the brainstem, and noradrenergic neurones located in the locus coeruleus (also in the brainstem) send projections to various parts of the brain involved in the control of mood, appetite, sexual activity, attention and concentration.
(45) The locus coeruleus is the sole source of noradrenergic innervation to the cortex.