Loewi


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

Loewi

Otto. 1873--1961, US pharmacologist, born in Germany. He shared a Nobel prize for physiology or medicine (1936) with Dale for their work on the chemical transmission of nerve impulses
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Kay (Gabriella Katherine Loewi) was born in the palazzo; of two sisters who later were born there as well, one died young and the other lives today in northern California.
And there, to his bafflement, is a beautiful young woman named Audrey (Fiona Loewi).
The acetylcholins were the first peptides discovered by Loewi in the 1920s, for which he received the Noble prize in 1936, and they cluster in the digestive system.
Furthermore, the suggested relationships imply that even if Synophrus politus and Rhoophilus loewi turned out to be true gall inducers instead of inquilines, one would have to conclude that they secondarily reverted from being inquilines back to being gall inducers.
The German-born American pharmacologist Otto Loewi (1873-1961) felt that chemicals were involved, too, especially where the nerve impulse had to jump the tiny gap (or synapse) from one nerve cell to another.
"The completion of the company's acquisition of Ohio Valley-Clarksburg is likely to add a minimum of $150 million in sales in fiscal 1991," says David Keuler, an analyst with Blunt, Ellis & Loewi. "And Cardinal could have considerable success in expanding its business to hospitals as it rolls out its computerized inventory system."
fuscipennis Loew l[male] 2[female]; Tetanocera loewi Steyskal 3[male] 1[female].
Safe action comedy, featuring Cameron Daddo, Fiona Loewi, Anne Anglin and Stacey DePass.
Completed "Bad Buys," Action-adventure; producers, Frederico Lapenda, Art Birzneck; director, Mtano Loewi; cast, Don Wilson, Lorenzo Lamas.
Roberts was immediately rebuked for the harsh tone of his letter by Henry Hallett Dale (1875-1968), a leading figure in British research, who shared the Nobel Prize with Otto Loewi (1873-1961) in 1936 for discoveries relating to the chemical transmission of nerve impulses.
They were first identified by Loewi in a series of brilliant experiments in the early 1920s, and for his work he shared the Noble Prize in Physiology of Medicine in 1936.