Logarithms


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

Logarithms

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Logarithms, which most schoolchildren are taught but promptly forget, were invented in 1614 to assist in astrological calculations. They constitute the most tedious part of traditional astrological mathematics and have been superseded by the computer.

The Astrology Book, Second Edition © 2003 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Computing discrete logarithms is apparently difficult (no efficient alogrithm is known), while the inverse problem of discrete exponentiation is not (it can be computed efficiently using exponentiation by squaring, for example).
Investigations of four types: a historical search, a conceptual analysis, clinical research involving mathematics teachers and their students, and the development of a curricular approach to logarithms that address the historical and cultural foundation of this mathematical concept was constructively informed and guided by mapping.
Logarithms (logs) are basically the inverse of exponents.
Starting with this simple fact, one can demonstrate that the same is true for areas of regions between the curve and the x-axis, and go on to prove properties of logarithms and verify certain limits.
The results were then converted into logarithms. Finally, these logarithms were normalized so that they equaled zero in the second quarter of 1979, the beginning of the EMS.
The Edinburgh-born genius discovered logarithms almost 400 years ago - and paved the way for the modern PC.
SIMPLE sums or mind-bending logarithms, even the youngest of students will benefit from this fantastic scientific calculator.
The new methodology uses logarithms, powers of two which compress the figures and change the complexity of the sums.
For business communicators, that's not such a novel concept - and we probably didn't have to suffer through logarithms to arrive at the conclusion.
The Scottish mathematician John Napier (1550-1617) spent years working out formulas that would give him appropriate exponents for a great many numbers, and he called them logarithms (from Greek words meaning "proportionate numbers").
The invention of logarithms in 1614 by John Napier of Scotland laid the foundation for the slide rule.
If unmeasured luxury characteristics have been creating a growing number of high-value outliers, using logarithms instead of untransformed values will reduce the likelihood that such growth will be interpreted as an increase in prices.