validity

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validity

[və′lid·əd·ē]
(mathematics)
Correctness; especially the degree of closeness by which iterated results approach the correct result.

validity

the extent to which a measure, indicator or method of data collection possesses the quality of being sound or true as far as can be judged. For example, if a psychological measure, such as an intelligence test, is considered to be valid, this means that it is thought to measure what it sets out to measure. If social survey observations are said to have produced valid data, then they are considered to be true reflection of the phenomenon being studied in the population being studied (e.g. projections of voting behaviour), and the survey method could be said to have validity. Compare RELIABILITY.

In practice, in sociology and the social sciences generally, the relation between indicators and measures on the one hand and the underlying concepts they are taken to represent is often contested (see OFFICIAL STATISTICS, MEASUREMENT BY FIAT).

References in periodicals archive ?
(14) Likewise, logical validity, as borrowed from modern logic, does not fully account for the role played by inferential necessity in the Prior Analytics.
Logical validity is not the only desirable property of an argument, but it is a condition that must be met before other criteria become relevant.
There is a way of interpreting principles of logical validity represented in semi-formal languages by means of inference-patterns like "P, therefore P"; it is the most natural interpretation when, as usual, we have in mind mathematical applications.
The validity of the logic model is termed logical validity. It has two components: analytical validity and theoretical validity.
Lamentably, however, doctrines like social Darwinism rarely (if ever) have to pass the test of their logical validity and soundness before they get drummed into the common consciousness and are digested whole by the uncritical masses.
The underlying concepts of evolution and feedback are therefore themselves products of a self-confessed misinterpretation, negating any "logical validity" in the conclusions it may draw.
In his new book, which draws significantly on papers published in the last two decades, he discusses the bearing of dialetheism on such key philosophical notions, as truth, negation, rationality, and logical validity. It is widely assumed that constitutive ingredients and implications of these notions make dialethism unacceptable, or at least highly implausible.