electron pair

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electron pair

[i′lek‚trän ′per]
(physical chemistry)
A pair of valence electrons which form a nonpolar bond between two neighboring atoms.
References in periodicals archive ?
The observed shifts to higher wavenumbers of the carbonyl absorption for formamide interacting with the nanoparticles can be explained by the nitrogen lone pair electrons being donated to the nanoparticles resulting in less delocalization of those electrons into the carbon-nitrogen amide bond, less stability of the carbon-oxygen, single-bond resonance structure, and more stability of the carbon-oxygen, double-bond resonance structure.
The fluorescent color that appears under the UV light is affected by the negative charge on the sulfate group for cellulose sulfate or, for methyl cellulose, by the lone pair of electrons on the methoxyl group.
The lone pair of rakish lavender overpants were being sported by a gentleman in his late fifties who was almost certainly a retired quantity surveyor and weekday member of a second-rate golf club.
Iodine is known to form complex with various polymers through lone pair of electrons [15].
Football is not just a multi-million-pound industry, it's a multi-million-pound BETTING industry, and it's surely unacceptable that a lone pair of eyes, possibly blood-shot and hung-over, can have the power to wreck multi-million betting slips.
Bismuth forms peculiar and complicated structures partly due to the presence of the inert lone pair electrons.
lone pair to an empty orbital as in hydrogen bonding (more information can be found elsewhere [39]).
Since the lone pair of train on the route used to terminate at Phulwaria, all the facilities were provided to that station, he added.
The two electrons left over in the form of a lone pair, which makes this species highly reactive to attack CO2.
The resulting cations are best described as 1:1 adducts of a neutral ligand on a phosphadiazonium Lewis acceptor (1), and highlight the potential for electron-rich centres to behave as Lewis acids in spite of the presence of a lone pair of electrons at the acceptor site.
A lone pair of peace protesters with signs bearing peace symbols quickly became the targets of their neighbors' hostility, enduring name-calling and verbal threats.