Longs Peak

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Longs Peak

[for Stephen H. LongLong, Stephen Harriman,
1784–1864, American explorer, b. Hopkinton, N.H. As an army engineer, Long was sent on several exploring and surveying expeditions. The first in 1817 was to the region of the upper Mississippi and the Fox-Wisconsin portage; it is recorded in his
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], 14,255 ft (4,345 m) high, N Colo., in the Front Range of the Rocky Mts. From the east side of its snowcapped peak there is a 2,000 ft (610 m) drop to Chasm Lake. It is in Rocky Mountain National Park.
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Longs Peak

a mountain in N Colorado, in the Front Range of the Rockies: the highest peak in the Rocky Mountain National Park. Height: 4345 m (14 255 ft.)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
From this vantage point, Stanley and his associates watched the shadow of the Moon approach from the northwest, covering in succession Long's Peak and the Mount of the Holy Cross.
The Long's Peak agenda is directed at maximizing federal regulation over water resource decisions and minimizing independent action under state and local law.
Blumm characterizes my Long's Peak critique as the "rhetoric of resistance." His use of colorful, personally-directed rhetoric, such as "anachronistic," "hyperbole," "diatribe," "attack," and "canard," demonstrates an enthusiasm for that art.
I do not propose to respond point by point to Blumm's article, but rather to dispute the form of historical and legal revisionism which I believe underpins his thesis, and which is also a major premise of the Long's Peak Report.
The panorama extends 100 miles in every direction - to Pikes Peak to the south, Gray's and Torrey's peaks to the west, Long's Peak to the north, and the Great Plains to the east.
Blumm, The Rhetoric of Water Reform Resistance: A Response To Hobbs' Critique of Long's Peak, 24 Envtl.
To deal with this situation, the Long's Peak Working Group was established in December of 1992 to help the incoming Clinton Administration develop an initial framework for the management of the nation's water resources.
The Long's Peak group developed a twelve page report, entitled "America's Waters: A New Era of Sustainability," which includes overviews of several basic principles, as well as forty-seven specific short- and mid-term recommendations for the Clinton Administration relating to sustainable water use.(2) The report offers an excellent analysis of the missing pieces of our nation's water policy puzzle and recommends how those pieces should be reconfigured.
Rosalie (1866), immense canvases that fired the Eastern imagination with water shining at the base of savage peaks.(1) hi that tradition, the 1992 Long's Peak Report conjures up another imaginary western landscape promising "A New Era of Sustainability" for America's waters based on "social equity, economic efficiency, ecological integrity, and continued commitment to federal trust responsibilities to tribes:" a national water policy to "fulfill[] Aldo Leopold's ~Land Etydc'."(2)
Hitching state water law and the Bureau of Reclamation to the whipping post has been a favorite sport of writers like Fradkin(6) and Reisner(7) and professors like Wilkinson and his colleagues at the Natural Resources Law Center who helped to write the Long's Peak Report.
Unfortunately, Hobbs' critique of the Long's Peak report(3) is not up to his usual standards.
Hobbs' attempt to indict the Long's Peak report as advocacy of "an imaginary Western wilderness" and "a one-dimensional argument for the exercise of federal agency power"(6) is easily refuted by a reading of the report itself, which the editors have been good enough to reprint in these pages.(7) Nowhere in the report's 47 recommendations is there anything remotely resembling a call for more wilderness or new federal authority over water management.