Long Parliament


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Related to Long Parliament: Rump Parliament, Short Parliament

Long Parliament:

see English civil warEnglish civil war,
1642–48, the conflict between King Charles I of England and a large body of his subjects, generally called the "parliamentarians," that culminated in the defeat and execution of the king and the establishment of a republican commonwealth.
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Long Parliament

sat from outbreak of Civil War to Charles II’s accession (1640–1660). [Br. Hist.: EB, VI: 319–320]
References in periodicals archive ?
For the members of the Company constituted a veritable roll call of prominent puritans who would later challenge the king politically in the Long Parliament and militarily in the civil wars.
Indeed, "the Long Parliament became obsessed with the king's foreign policy" (176-178).
He was so successful in the second regard that before long Parliament changed the law.
In the debates of the Long Parliament in 1644-46 this quandary came into sharp focus over the problem of the "lay" or "ruling" elder: a church official who combined spiritual and secular characteristics and whose clerical status was therefore uncertain.
Have you no shame--no shame at all?" Alternatively, if you prefer, the message that Oliver Cromwell addressed to the English Long Parliament in 1649: "You have been here too long for any good that you have done.
Every student of the Long Parliament relies heavily on his parliamentary diary, yet little attention has been paid to the man who faithfully and industriously kept it.
Yamasaki told reporters separately that senior members of the LDP-led ruling bloc will decide by Monday how long parliament will be extended.
The second moment, one much more open to idealisation, was 1641 when the constitutional deck-clearing of the Long Parliament's legislation provided "a magnet of social dreams".
Milton did not need to hide his views from those in power (the Members of the Long Parliament), for many of them would have understood his drift.
(The Rump is the name historians have given to what remained of the Long Parliament following the expulsion of two-thirds of its members in 1648.) Brome was also the author of a comedy, The Cunning Lovers (1654), and edited two volumes of plays by Richard Brome (no relation) and a translation of Horace.
The Character of the Long Parliament and Assembly of Divines (1681) was subsequently discovered to have originated as a |Digression' from Book III of the History.
When he points out that of the 658 members of the still aristocratic House of Commons of 1880, "twenty-three MPs were directly descended from families who had sat in the Long Parliament" (185) of the 1640s, the reader is surprised that the number was not far larger.