Long Sault Rapids

Long Sault Rapids

(sō, so͞o), in the Ottawa River, Canada, midway between Ottawa and Montreal. There in 1660 the Iroquois defeated a party of 18 Frenchmen, led by Dollard des Ormeaux, who were attempting to save Montreal.
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References in periodicals archive ?
From there, he planned to shoot the Rapids du Plat and the Long Sault Rapids, lying between Morrisburg and Cornwall.
At 1030 hours Wilkinson got General Brown's report that his success at Hoople Creek had opened the way ahead, but resolved to eliminate the annoyance to his rear before proceeding to the Long Sault Rapids. Wilkinson still claimed that he was indisposed with illness, as was his second-in-command.
One needs several hours to properly explore Kay-Nah-Chi-Wah-Nung, including the tour of the visitors centre, the Anglican cemetery (circa late 1800s), the round House, then a walk through a boreal forest that takes you to the Long Sault Rapids to the site of the majority of the burial mounds.
Elders say that hundreds of people would gather at the Long Sault rapids to hunt, fish, and trade.
After descending the Long Sault Rapids, the army came to rest at Pointe Maligne, where it camped on September 1st, 1760.