Long Barrows

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Long Barrows

 

the burial remains of the Krivichi, dating from the sixth to 10th centuries. They are common in the upper reaches of the Zapadnaia Dvina, Dnieper, and Lovat’ rivers and in the basins of the Velikaia River and Pskov Lake. The barrows are earthen mounds, oval and elongated or bank-like in form, containing the remains of several cremations. They are usually 15-80 m long and 7-15 m wide with an average height of 0.8-1.5 m. Usually they contain from two to ten, less often 11 to 20, burials in small piles of charred human bones (sometimes in clay vessels). Occasionally metal objects, ornaments, buckles, and knives are found along with the remains. Long barrows were gradually superseded by round barrows containing single cremations.

REFERENCES

Cherniagin, N. N. “Dlinnye kurgany i sopki.” In the book Materialy i issledovaniia po arkheologii SSSR, no. 6. Moscow, 1941.
Tarakanova, S. A. “Dlinnye i udlinennye kurgany.” In the collection Sovetskaia arkheologiia, vol. 19. Moscow, 1954.
Sedov, V. V. “Krivichi.” Sovetskaia arkheologiia, 1960, no. 1.
References in periodicals archive ?
The long barrow, found in the middle of a farmer's field halfway between the two major monuments of Avebury and Stonehenge, was first spotted by aerial photography and than assessed by geophysical survey imagery.
The mound appearing through the mist was the burial mound (long barrow).
Meanwhile, about twelve miles west of Stonehenge in the vicinity of the Boles earthen long barrow near Warminster, there was a litter of glacially shifted stones from the Preselis.
However when the researchers used a revolutionary technique for dating remains to create a time-line, they realized that the process from agriculture to the development of long barrow chambers and causewayed enclosures happened much quicker than originally thought.
Paula Copestake, from Winchcombe in the Cotswolds, told her own personal story of seeing a procession of hooded men make their way across grassland close to the Neolithic long barrow of Belas Knap.
Your own windmill You can see for almost 20 miles across Dartmoor and to the South Hams from the top of this beautifully renovated windmill at Long Barrow Windmill, Moles Lane, North Whilborough, Devon.
There is a steep climb to about a thousand feet on this walk; the reward is a view of the magnificent long barrow called Belas Knap.
Building memories; the neolithic Cotswold Long Barrow at Ascott-Under-Wychwood, Oxfordshire.
Within a few steps a gate on the left leads to the famous Notgrove long barrow which is said to be 4,000 years old.
Dr Jim Leary, director of the Archaeology Field School, said: "Opportunities to fully investigate long barrows are virtually unknown in recent times, and this represents a fantastic chance to carefully excavate one using the very latest techniques and technology.