longitudinal redundancy check


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longitudinal redundancy check

[‚län·jə′tüd·ən·əl ri′dən·dən·sē ‚chek]
(communications)
A method of checking for errors, in which data are arranged in blocks according to some rule, and the correctness of each character in the block is determined according to the rule. Abbreviated LRC.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Longitudinal Redundancy Check

(storage, communications)
(LRC, Block Redundancy Check) An error checking method that generates a longitudinal parity byte from a specified string or block of bytes on a longitudinal track.

The longitudinal parity byte is created by placing individual bytes of a string in a two-dimensional array and performing a Vertical Redundancy Check vertically and horizontally on the array, creating an extra byte. This is an improvement over the VRC because it will catch two errors in the individual characters of the string, beyond the odd errors.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

longitudinal redundancy check

An error checking method that generates a parity bit from a specified string of bits on a longitudinal track. In a row and column format, such as on magnetic tape, longitudinal redundancy check (LRC) is often used with vertical redundancy check (VRC), which creates a parity bit for each character.
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