longitudinal study

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longitudinal study

[‚län·jə‚tüd·ən·əl ′stəd·ē]
(psychology)
The study of a group of individuals at regular intervals over a relatively long period of time.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

longitudinal study

an investigation which involves making observations of the same group at sequential time intervals. Thus, a longitudinal study of a COHORT of children may be made to assess, for example, the effect of social class on school achievement (see BIRTH COHORT STUDY). Longitudinal studies are used by the National Children's Bureau to document various aspects of children's development in the UK. However, longitudinal studies are not only appropriate for studying human development or change, they may also be used to observe change over time within organizations.

The advantage of longitudinal studies compared with CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDIES is that the causal factor involved in a sequence of changes an be directly explored using data collected before and after changes (e.g. analysis of the effect of changes in the school curriculum). The main disadvantages are the greater expense of repeated study, the possible HAWTHORNE EFFECT of repeated studies and the influence of other changes which may be occurring concurrently (e.g. changes in the school curriculum may take place at the same time as changes in the resourcing of educational services). Compare PANEL STUDY.

Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
Friedmann, who will serve as principal investigator, is also teaming with National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program colleagues Eleanor Simonsick, PhD, epidemiologist, Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), and Stephanie Studenski, MD, MPH, chief, Longitudinal Studies Section Translational Gerontology and director, BLSA, and with Nancy R.
Isometsa was the lead investigator for two longitudinal studies of Finnish patients with mood disorders: the Vantaa Primary Care Depression Study and the Jorvi Bipolar Study.
Together with partner institutions, the 2042 initiative will develop and implement transformative longitudinal studies in other countries around the world as well as transformative research projects in different societal areas.
ERIC Descriptors: Grade 8; Longitudinal Studies; Surveys; Children; Factor Structure; Demography; Grouping (Instructional Purposes); Intervention; Middle School Students; Social Adjustment; Emotional Adjustment; Social Environment; Context Effect; School Role; Predictor Variables; Factor Analysis; Structural Equation Models
Professor Heather Joshi, of the University of London's Centre for Longitudinal Studies, who wrote the report, said that more than 90 per cent of those children had some kind of formal education between three and five, compared to "around 40 or 50 per cent" in the 80s.
What is the connection between longitudinal studies and advanced second-language (L2) capacity?
Most well-known longitudinal studies assessing behavior and mental health problems have been conducted by research teams led by investigators with affiliations other than social work.
While she includes evidence from several African American and working class high school yearbooks, the majority of her sources (from diaries, interviews, magazines and contemporary longitudinal studies) reveal an emerging teen identity designed by the white middle class.
A systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies was undertaken in order to estimate the sex-specific effect of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) on the acquisition of HIV infection.

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