longitudinal study

(redirected from Longitudinal survey)
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longitudinal study

[‚län·jə‚tüd·ən·əl ′stəd·ē]
(psychology)
The study of a group of individuals at regular intervals over a relatively long period of time.

longitudinal study

an investigation which involves making observations of the same group at sequential time intervals. Thus, a longitudinal study of a COHORT of children may be made to assess, for example, the effect of social class on school achievement (see BIRTH COHORT STUDY). Longitudinal studies are used by the National Children's Bureau to document various aspects of children's development in the UK. However, longitudinal studies are not only appropriate for studying human development or change, they may also be used to observe change over time within organizations.

The advantage of longitudinal studies compared with CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDIES is that the causal factor involved in a sequence of changes an be directly explored using data collected before and after changes (e.g. analysis of the effect of changes in the school curriculum). The main disadvantages are the greater expense of repeated study, the possible HAWTHORNE EFFECT of repeated studies and the influence of other changes which may be occurring concurrently (e.g. changes in the school curriculum may take place at the same time as changes in the resourcing of educational services). Compare PANEL STUDY.

References in periodicals archive ?
the "german internet panel" (gip) is a randomized online longitudinal survey.
Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) National Longitudinal Survey show small differences in the average number of jobs held by men and women who were ages 18-48, born toward the end of the baby boom (the baby boom includes those born from 1946 to 1964).
Rank has been studying the economic fortunes of several thousand families in the longest running longitudinal survey in America, dating back to 1968.
Sarah Asebedo, doctoral student in the College of Human Ecology's personal financial planning and conflict resolution program, Edina, Minnesota, conducted the study using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979.
The Study: The researchers analyzed data on 9,600 children 2-5 years old in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey, looking at their intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and body mass index (BMI), an indicator of obesity.
The longitudinal survey, which followed 407 girls (mean age 17.
Among 24-year-olds surveyed for the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), those with more education were more likely to have jobs.
The paper presents data from a National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97) to explore the "lifetime prevalence" or the percentage of youth who ever run away from home, number of runaway episodes and the age at which they first run away.
findings from a national longitudinal survey of youth, Pediatrics, 2008, 122(5):1047-1054.
Data from a US national longitudinal survey of 2000 teens (12 to 17 years, monitored to 15 to 20 years) were used to assess whether exposure predicted subsequent pregnancy for girls or responsibility for pregnancy for boys.
The findings are based on data from a national longitudinal survey of adolescents aged 12-17 years at baseline.
My study does indicate that 8th graders in the National Education Longitudinal Survey (1988) performed better on a variety of outcomes when assigned to a teacher of their own gender.

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