Longworth, Nicholas

Longworth, Nicholas,

1869–1931, American legislator, b. Cincinnati. A lawyer, he practiced in Cincinnati, where his family had long been prominent. He served (1899–1903) in the Ohio legislature and, with the support of George B. CoxCox, George Barnsdale,
1853–1916, American politician, Republican boss of Cincinnati, b. Cincinnati. A former bootblack, he turned to real estate and local politics after selling his saloon in 1881.
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, was elected (1903) to the U.S. House of Representatives. He married (1906) Alice Lee Roosevelt (see Longworth, Alice Lee RooseveltLongworth, Alice Lee Roosevelt,
1884–1980, American socialite, b. New York City. The only child of Theodore Roosevelt and his first wife, Alice Hathaway Lee, she was a teenager when her father assumed the presidency, and she enlivened the White House with her charm,
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), the daughter of President Theodore Roosevelt. As a congressman (1903–13, 1915–31), Longworth was (1925–31) Speaker of the House and became recognized as a master of congressional procedure.
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Longworth, Nicholas

(1869–1931) U.S. representative; born in Cincinnati, Ohio. Son of a wealthy, prominent Cincinnati family, he graduated from Harvard University and the University of Cincinnati Law School. He entered Republican politics, serving in the Ohio house (1899–1901) and senate (1901–03) before going to Congress (Rep., Ohio; 1903–13 and 1915–31). In 1906 he made a brilliant match when he married Alice Lee Roosevelt, daughter of Theodore Roosevelt, in the White House. He studied parliamentary procedures and was Republican floor leader before being elected Speaker (1925–31). He advocated strong leadership, adherence to House rules, and cooperation. His fairness endeared him to Democrats and he eliminated the use of personal invective in congressional debates. A natural mediator, he did not hesitate to oppose his father-in-law when he supported Taft's presidential bid in 1912. A talented musician, he and his wife were much admired in Washington, D.C., society.
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.