Loose-fill insulation

Loose-fill insulation

A material that can be blown into an area, such as an attic space, which provides insulating qualities by the air pockets created within the material.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

loose-fill insulation

Thermal insulation in the form of granules, nodules, fibers, powder, flakes, or shreds; may be hand-packed, pneumatically placed, or poured into cavities or over supporting membranes. Also see granular-fill insulation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Addition of chemicals in loose-fill insulation materials to provide fire resistance properties for specific industrial application such as in cookhouse will continue to provide potential growth prospects of the insulation blow-in machine market.
Loose-fill insulation is made up of small particles of fiber, foam or other materials that can conform to spaces without disrupting any structures.
So-called loose-fill insulation has a density between 20 and 70 kg/m3 (Nicolajsen, 2005; Vejelis et al., 2006).
Having outstanding insulating characteristics and being of light weight, it is widely used as loose-fill insulation in masonry construction.
Griffiths and Zuluaga (2004) used a two-dimensional, steady-state FEM to calculate the effective R-value of ducts buried under three levels of loose-fill insulation, as shown in Figure 1.
NOMENCLATURE f = height of loose-fill insulation as a fraction of fully-buried height.
| Loose-fill insulation for ground-floor void - using recycled foamed glass pebbles.
There are many ways in which asbestos can become a risk: disturbing loose-fill insulation, removing shingles or siding, tampering with roofing felt, ripping asbestos insulation from a hot water tank, sanding asbestos floor tiles, breaking apart ceiling tiles, and sanding plaster or coatings such as roofing compounds, sealants, paint, caulking, or drywall containing asbestos.
If you need to add more, go with loose-fill insulation rather than fiberglass batts even if you already have fiberglass.
Other loose-fill insulation, such as perlite or vermiculite, also can be used.
Climate Pro[R] loose-fill insulation is blown into framed cavities behind netting and is perfect for insulating new custom construction, including sidewalls, ceilings and floors.
The EPA estimated in 1985 that the loose-fill insulation had been installed in 940,000 U.S.