Lophophora


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Related to Lophophora: Lophophora williamsii
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Lophophora

 

a genus of globe-shaped cacti. There are three or four species distributed in the southern United States and in Mexico at elevations of 1,600-2,100 m above sea level. The best known is L. williamsii, called peyote or peyotl by the local population. Its stem and turnip-shaped root contain alkaloids (mescaline, lophophorine, peyotine) that cause colorful visual and auditory hallucinations. L. williamsii is an ancient holy plant of the American Indians.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
wrightii & Ross, 1988; Mauseth et al., 1998; Sajeva & Mauseth, 1991 Leuchtenbergia principis Eggli, 1984; Mauseth & Plemons- Rodriguez, 1998; Sajeva & Mauseth, 1991 Lophophora williamsii Eggli, 1984; Gibson, 1973; Mauseth & Plemons-Rodriguez, 1998; Sajeva & Mauseth, 1991 Mammillaria brandegeei, M.
Its formal scientific name is Lophophora williamsii, but it is popularly known as peyote (from the Nahuatl term peyotl).
(36.) Mescal is the peyote cactus or Lophophora williamsii, whose flowering heads or "mescal buttons" are the active ingredient in the alkaloid mescaline.
Some of the earliest evidence of plant use by Native Americans are fossil remains of peyote (Lophophora williamsi), a hallucinogen, excavated from caves in Texas and dated about 7000 B.C.
fitchii, Ferocactus setispinus, Lophophora williamsii, Mammillaria heyderi, Mammillaria sphaerica, O.
Mescaline is the major psychoactive alkaloid of two cactus species, Lophophora williamsii (Lem.) Coulter (peyote) and Trichocereus pachanoi Britton et Rose (San Pedro).
Al centro hay un patio en el que se crian los animales domesticos (burros, mulas, cerdos, aves y perros) y se siembran hortalizas, plantas medicinales y hikuri (3) ("peyote" o Lophophora Williamsii).
Peyote, Lophophora williamsii, a small, green, spineless cactus indigenous to the Rio Grande River region adjacent to the current Texas-Mexico boundary, grows in single or small clusters of "buttons" attached to a taproot.
(2, 3, 4) JB g Lophophora diffusa 182, 200 Semidesierto (Croizat) Bravo (A) (1, 3, 4) JB Queretano Gc Mammillaria compressa 198 (3, 4) JB Desierto Chihuahuense subsp.compressa (Schum.) Borg.