lophophore

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Related to Lophophorates: phoronids, Bryozoans

Lophophore

The crown of tentacles which surrounds the mouth in the Bryozoa, Phoronida, and Brachiopoda. The numerous ciliated tentacles arise from a circular or horseshoe-shaped fold of the body wall. The tentacles are hollow outgrowths of the body wall, each containing fluid-filled extensions of the body cavity and extended hydraulically. The primary function of the lophophore is to gather food. On the tentacles are ciliary tracts which drive a current of food-particle-bearing water through the lophophore. While the lophophore is primarily a feeding organ, it may also play a role in reproduction, respiration, and larval locomotion. See Brachiopoda, Bryozoa, Phoronida

lophophore

[′läf·ə‚fȯr]
(invertebrate zoology)
A food-gathering organ consisting of a fleshy basal ridge or lobe, from which numerous ciliated tentacles arise; found in Bryozoa, Phoronida, and Brachiopoda.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, if we add Palaeozoic tubeworms of lophophorate affinities to this record, the shelly faunas of the Palaeozoic era may have been even more dominated by lophophorates than previously thought.
The group likely shares affinities with lophophorates.
In modern oceans lophophorate worms are represented by non-biomineralizing phoronids which dwell in mucus tubes (Emig 1982).
Convergence in the feeding apparatuses of lophophorates and pterobranch hemichordates revealed by 18S rDNA: an interpretation.
Multigene analysis of lophophorate and chaetognath phylogenetic relationships.
Inferences from DNA sequence data place these lophophorate phyla in a different clade of bilaterians, the lophotrochozoa (Halanych, 2004).
Function of lateral cilia in suspension feeding of lophophorates (Brachiopoda, Phoronida, Ectoprocta).
For example, phoronids are not colonial, but these lophophorate suspension feeders can live in very dense aggregations (up to 20,000 [m.
We examined the effect of type of locomotion on time to first swimming in four comparisons of animals with uniciliated or multiciliated cells: the cnidarians versus the ctenophore, other lophophorates versus the bryozoan, echinoderms versus the Lophotrochozoa with multiciliated cells (the bryozoan, nemertean, annelids, and molluscs), and the oweniid versus other polychaetes.
An exception occurred in the lophophorates, in which the bryozoan had the longest time to swimming as well as the longest cell cycle.