Lorentz factor


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Related to Lorentz factor: length contraction

Lorentz factor

[′lȯr‚ens ‚fak·tər]
(relativity)
An important parameter in special relativity, equal to 1/√(1-(v / c)2), where c is the speed of light and v is the constant relative velocity of two frames of reference.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2) It follows that the observed luminosity should be linearly dependent on the jet's Lorentz factor, yet this claim is not justified.
It is shown that the fastest rise in a light curve is related to the Lorentz factor [GAMMA] simply due to the geometrical rise time for a region subtending an angle of 1/[GAMMA], assuming that the minimum radius for which the optical depth of the jet material is of order of unity remains constant.
According to the relativistic time dilation, the lifetimes are related as follows: [[tau].sub.p] = [[tau].sub.0][[gamma].sub.L], where yL is the corresponding relativistic Lorentz factor. Refer to [7,8,12-17] for an extended explanation.
The scaling factor consists in the corresponding relativistic Lorentz factor [[gamma].sub.L].
where [r.sub.[mu]] = 1.37 x [10.sup.-17] m is classical muon radius, [[beta].sup.*.sub.u] is beta function of muon beam at IP, and [[gamma].sub.[mu]] the Lorentz factor of muon beam.
The main similarity is that PFT predicts length contraction and time dilation by the usual Lorentz factor, provided measurements are executed in the preferred frame (in more detail Rybicki [12]).
From the fact that clocks and measuring rods moving with respect to S are distorted in the definite way by the Lorentz factor it follows that, in S', the speed of light traveling along x-axis is, dependently on the (positive or negative) direction:
The Lorentz factor gives length contraction and time dilation.
Any event point in the dark regions of space that does not violate the Lorentz factor impact of the gravitational force between the two coordinate systems (K) and (K") can be considered to be on the constant curvature.
Length-Contraction Factor C(v) is just Lorentz Factor: